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FDI spillovers and firm ownership in China: labor markets and backward linkages


  • Galina Hale
  • Cheryl Long


Using firm–level data, we find that the presence of foreign firms in China is positively associated with the performance of domestically owned private firms but is negatively associated with the performance of state–owned enterprises (SOEs). In particular, we find: (1) the presence of foreign direct investment (FDI) is associated with larger differences in the wages and the quality of skilled workers between SOEs and private firms; and, (2) FDI presence is positively associated with private firms’ sales to foreign firms and foreign consumers, but not with the sales of SOEs. We argue that these differences could be due to the fact that private firms have more flexible wage and personnel policies, which allows them to attract talent that facilitates positive FDI spillovers.

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  • Galina Hale & Cheryl Long, 2006. "FDI spillovers and firm ownership in China: labor markets and backward linkages," Working Paper Series 2006-25, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2006-25

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stefan Lutz & Oleksandr Talavera, 2004. "Do Ukrainian Firms Benefit from FDI?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 77-98, June.
    2. Wang, Jian-Ye & Blomstrom, Magnus, 1992. "Foreign investment and technology transfer : A simple model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 137-155, January.
    3. Kato, Takao & Long, Cheryl, 2006. "Executive Compensation, Firm Performance, and Corporate Governance in China: Evidence from Firms Listed in the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(4), pages 945-983, July.
    4. Zhang, Kevin Honglin & Song, Shunfeng, 2001. "Promoting exports: the role of inward FDI in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 385-396.
    5. Jeffry M. Netter & William L. Megginson, 2001. "From State to Market: A Survey of Empirical Studies on Privatization," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 321-389, June.
    6. Rhee, Yung Whee, 1990. "The catalyst model of development: Lessons from Bangladesh's success with garment exports," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 333-346, February.
    7. Hallward-Driemeier, Mary & Wallsten, Scott & Lixin Colin Xu, 2003. "The investment climate and the firm : firm-level evidence from China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3003, The World Bank.
    8. Rodriguez-Clare, Andres, 1996. "Multinationals, Linkages, and Economic Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 852-873, September.
    9. Sinani, Evis & Meyer, Klaus E., 2004. "Spillovers of technology transfer from FDI: the case of Estonia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 445-466, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ouyang, Puman & Fu, Shihe, 2012. "Economic growth, local industrial development and inter-regional spillovers from foreign direct investment: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 445-460.
    2. Dinga, Marián & Münich, Daniel, 2010. "The impact of territorially concentrated FDI on local labor markets: Evidence from the Czech Republic," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 354-367, April.

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    Investments; Foreign ; China;

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