IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Consumer behavior and payment choice: a conference summary


  • Marianne Crowe
  • Scott Schuh
  • Joanna Stavins


The Emerging Payments Research Group (EPRG) at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston sponsored a new conference, “Consumer Behavior and Payment Choice: How and Why Do Consumers Choose Their Payment Methods?” on October 27–28, 2005, at the Boston Fed. The conference brought together a diverse set of participants from the academic, private, and public sectors. This paper provides a summary and overview of the conference. Key conclusions are that the consumer’s decision-making process concerning payment choice is quite complex, that standard economic models have difficulty incorporating this complexity, that additional research—especially interdisciplinary research—into consumer choice of payment method is needed, and that this conference was an important step in that direction.

Suggested Citation

  • Marianne Crowe & Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2006. "Consumer behavior and payment choice: a conference summary," Public Policy Discussion Paper 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbpp:06-1

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kahn, Charles M. & Roberds, William, 2008. "Credit and identity theft," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 251-264, March.
    2. Hayashi Fumiko & Klee Elizabeth, 2003. "Technology Adoption and Consumer Payments: Evidence from Survey Data," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-16, June.
    3. Byoung-Min Kim & Richard Widdows & Tansel Yilmazer, 2005. "The determinants of consumers’ adoption of Internet banking," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    4. Eugene Amromin & Carrie Jankowski & Richard D. Porter, 2007. "Transforming payment choices by doubling fees on the Illinois Tollway," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 22-47.
    5. Stacey L. Schreft, 2005. "How and why do consumers choose their payment methods?," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Hromcová, Jana & Callado-Muñoz, Francisco J. & Utrero-González, Natalia, 2014. "Effects of direct pricing of retail payment methods in Norway," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 428-438.
    2. Margaret Carten & Daniel A. Littman & Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2007. "Consumer behavior and payment choice : 2006 conference summary," Public Policy Discussion Paper 07-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    More about this item


    Payment systems ; Electronic funds transfers;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedbpp:06-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Catherine Spozio). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.