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The Question of Generation Adequacy in Liberalised Electricity Markets

Author

Listed:
  • L.J. de Vries

    (Delft University of Technology)

  • R.A. Hakvoort

    (Delft University of Technology)

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of the reasons why unregulated markets for the production of electricity cannot be expected to invest sufficiently in generation capacity on a continuous basis. Although it can be shown that periodic price spikes should provide generation companies with sufficient investment incentives in theory, there are a number of probable causes of market failure. A likely result is the development of investment cycles that may affect the adequacy of capacity. The experience in California shows the great social costs associated with an episode of scarce generation capacity. Another disadvantage is that generation companies can manipulate price spikes. This would result in large transfers of income from consumers to producers and reduce the operational reliability of electricity supply during these price spikes. We end this paper by outlining several methods that have been proposed to stabilise the market, which provide better incentives to generation companies and consumers alike.

Suggested Citation

  • L.J. de Vries & R.A. Hakvoort, 2004. "The Question of Generation Adequacy in Liberalised Electricity Markets," Working Papers 2004.120, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2004.120
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    File URL: http://www.feem.it/userfiles/attach/Publication/NDL2004/NDL2004-120.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Newbery, D., 2002. "Regulatory Challenges to European Electricity Liberalisation," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0230, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Hirst, Eric & Hadley, Stan, 1999. "Generation Adequacy: Who Decides?," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 12(8), pages 11-21, October.
    3. Shuttleworth, Graham, 1997. "Getting markets to clear," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 2-2, April.
    4. Besser, Janet Gail & Farr, John G. & Tierney, Susan F., 2002. "The Political Economy of Long-Term Generation Adequacy: Why an ICAP Mechanism is Needed as Part of Standard Market Design," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 15(7), pages 53-62.
    5. Ford, Andrew, 1999. "Cycles in competitive electricity markets: a simulation study of the western United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 637-658, October.
    6. Hirst, Eric, 2000. "Do We Need More Transmission Capacity?," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 13(9), pages 78-89, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:juipol:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:76-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:juipol:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Fran├žois Coppens & David Vivet, 2006. "The single European electricity market: A long road to convergence," Working Paper Document 84, National Bank of Belgium.
    4. Simshauser, Paul, 2010. "Vertical integration, credit ratings and retail price settings in energy-only markets: Navigating the Resource Adequacy problem," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 7427-7441, November.
    5. Arango, Santiago & Larsen, Erik, 2011. "Cycles in deregulated electricity markets: Empirical evidence from two decades," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2457-2466, May.
    6. Thure Traber, 2014. "Capacity Mechanisms on Central European Electricity Markets: Effects on Consumers, Producers and Technologies until 2033," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1385, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Generation adequacy; Liberalised electricity market;

    JEL classification:

    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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