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Temporary Migrations and Restrictive Migratory Policies


  • Francesco Magris

    () (EPEE, University of Evry)

  • Giuseppe Russo

    () (DISES, University of Salerno)


Most of the literature on immigration sees it as a permanent phenomenon, which can best be contained by adopting strict policies of border closure. On the other hand, there is considerable historical documentation to show how often immigration is temporary. That is to say, immigrants stay for a certain period of time in the rich countries so as to accumulate wealth for later use in their countries of origin. However, full-scale border closure discourages these immigrants from returning to their own countries since they fear that, should they wish to once more migrate – compelled by those adverse circumstances that frequently afflict poor countries – it would prove difficult to do so. Thus full-scale border closure does not always bring about the desired reduction in the number of immigrants settled in the rich countries: on the contrary, it encourages family reunions, thereby further increasing the number of immigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Magris & Giuseppe Russo, 2006. "Temporary Migrations and Restrictive Migratory Policies," Documents de recherche 06-05, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:eve:wpaper:06-05

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Barry Chiswick & Timothy J. Hatton, 2003. "International Migration and the Integration of Labor Markets," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 65-120 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Parent, Antoine & Rault, Christophe, 2004. "The Influences Affecting French Assets Abroad Prior to 1914," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 64(02), pages 328-362, June.
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    More about this item


    Clandestinity; Entry requirements; Family reunions; Income distribution; Social integration; Solidarity; Temporary migrations;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration


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