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The Relative Significance of EPAs in Asia-Pacific


  • KAWASAKI Kenichi


This paper analyzes the relative significance of regional Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) in Asia-Pacific. The economy-wide impacts of tariff removals and reductions in non-tariff measures (NTMs) are estimated by using a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model of global trade. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) are shown to complement each other rather than be competitors. The income gains of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies as a whole account for 1.2 per cent of regional GDP by the TPP, 2.1 per cent by the RCEP, and 4.3 per cent by the Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP). Meanwhile, larger economic benefits are expected from NTMs reductions in addition to tariff removals. It is thus essential to reform domestic markets in order to enjoy greater economic benefits from international EPAs.

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  • KAWASAKI Kenichi, 2014. "The Relative Significance of EPAs in Asia-Pacific," Discussion papers 14009, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:14009

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    1. Itakura, Ken & Hertel, Thomas & Jeff Reimer, 2003. "The Contribution of Productivity Linkages to the General Equilibrium Analysis of Free Trade Agreements," GTAP Working Papers 1193, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
    2. Yoshifumi Fukunaga & Arata Kuno, 2012. "Toward a Consolidated Preferential Tariff Structure in East Asia: Going beyond ASEAN+1 FTAs," Working Papers PB-2012-03, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
    3. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
    4. Zhai, Fan, 2008. "Armington Meets Melitz: Introducing Firm Heterogeneity in a Global CGE Model of Trade," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 23, pages 575-604.
    5. Peter A. Petri & Michael G. Plummer & Fan Zhai, 2012. "The Trans-Pacific Partnership and Asia-Pacific Integration: A Quantitative Assessment," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 6642.
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