IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eti/dpaper/13077.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

On Biased Technical Change: Was technological change in Japan electricity-saving?

Author

Listed:
  • SATO Hitoshi

Abstract

Since the Great East Japan Earthquake, electricity generation has declined in Japan, and electricity prices have allegedly increased. The literature on biased technical change suggests that such electricity supply constraints may induce a biased technical change. This paper explores the extent to which the technical change in Japanese industries is biased, using a system of translog cost share equations where electricity and non-electric energy are separately treated as inputs. Using Japanese industry data over the 1973-2008 period, our findings confirm that technical change has been energy-saving but not electricity-saving in many industries, and that it tends to be labor-saving and capital-using. As a result, factor prices are much more important than technical change as a determinant of electricity's cost share.

Suggested Citation

  • SATO Hitoshi, 2013. "On Biased Technical Change: Was technological change in Japan electricity-saving?," Discussion papers 13077, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:13077
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/13e077.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. HOSOE Nobuhiro & AKIYAMA Shu-ichi, 2008. "Regional Electric Power Demand in Japan," Discussion papers 08005, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Berndt, Ernst R, 1976. "Reconciling Alternative Estimates of the Elasticity of Substitution," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 58(1), pages 59-68, February.
    3. Berndt, Ernst R & Wood, David O, 1975. "Technology, Prices, and the Derived Demand for Energy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 259-268, August.
    4. Ichiro Fukunaga & Mitsuhiro Osada, 2009. "Measuring Energy-Saving Technical Change in Japan," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 09-E-5, Bank of Japan.
    5. Matsukawa Isamu & Madono Seishi & Nakashima Takako, 1993. "An Empirical Analysis of Ramsey Pricing in Japanese Electric Utilities," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 256-276, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Johanna Vogel & Kurt Kratena & Kathrin Hranyai, 2015. "The Bias of Technological Change in Europe," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 98, WWWforEurope.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:13077. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (KUMAGAI, Akiko). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rietijp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.