IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ess/wpaper/id2679.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Examining The Case For Reserve Pooling In East Asia: Empirical Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Ramkishen S. Rajan

    ()

  • Reza Y. Siregar

    ()

  • Graham Bird

    ()

Abstract

Two features of East Asia’s recovery from the financial turmoil of 1997- 98 appear to be rather paradoxical. First, the regional economies (except Hong Kong, China and Malaysia) have allowed a relatively greater albeit modest degree of variability of their currencies according to market conditions. Second, the regional monetary authorities have simultaneously appeared keen on bolstering reserves to historically high levels. This paper examines the subject of reserve management in the broader context of monetary cooperation in East Asia. The paper briefly reviews the factors that go into the determination of “optimal reserves†in general, and specifically in the case of East Asia. It then goes on to investigate the gains, if any, to be reaped if the East Asian economies were to pool their reserves. [Working Paper No. 15]

Suggested Citation

  • Ramkishen S. Rajan & Reza Y. Siregar & Graham Bird, 2010. "Examining The Case For Reserve Pooling In East Asia: Empirical Analysis," Working Papers id:2679, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2679
    Note: Institutional Papers
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document12072010320.4230005.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=2679&fref=repec
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hernandez, Leonardo & Montiel, Peter J., 2003. "Post-crisis exchange rate policy in five Asian countries: Filling in the "hollow middle"?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 336-369, September.
    2. Ramikishen Rajan, 2002. "Exchange Rate Policy Options for Post-crisis Southeast Asia: Is There a Case for Currency Baskets?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 137-163, January.
    3. Aizenman, Joshua & Marion, Nancy, 2003. "The high demand for international reserves in the Far East: What is going on?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 370-400, September.
    4. Peter B. Clark, 1970. "Demand for International Reserves: A Cross-Country Analysis," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 3(4), pages 577-594, November.
    5. Ramkishen Rajan & Reza Siregar & Graham Bird, 2002. "Capital Flows and Regional Financial Interdependencies in the Context of Crises: Evidence From East Asia," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2002-19, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    6. Barry J. Eichengreen & Donald J Mathieson, 2000. "The Currency Composition of Foreign Exchange Reserves; Retrospect and Prospect," IMF Working Papers 00/131, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Jeffrey Frankel & Andrew Rose, 2002. "An Estimate of the Effect of Common Currencies on Trade and Income," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 437-466.
    8. Kawai, Masahiro & Takagi, Shinji, 2000. "Proposed strategy for a regional exchange rate arrangement in post-crisis East Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2503, The World Bank.
    9. Frenkel, Jacob A & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1981. "Optimal International Reserves: A Stochastic Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 91(362), pages 507-514, June.
    10. Graham Bird & Ramkishen Rajan, 2002. "The Political Economy of A Trade-First Approach to Regionalism," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2002-18, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    11. Hazel Selvon & Tracy Polius & Oral Williams, 2001. "Reserve Pooling in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union and the CFA Franc Zone; A Comparative Analysis," IMF Working Papers 01/104, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Pontines, Victor & Siregar, Reza, 2009. "Intervention index and exchange rate regimes: the cases of selected East-Asian economies," MPRA Paper 17138, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ndiaye, Ndeye Djiba & Masih, Mansur, 2017. "Is inflation targeting the proper monetary policy regime in a dual banking system? new evidence from ARDL bounds test," MPRA Paper 79420, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    East Asia; Financial turmoil; Hong Kong; China; Malaysia; Optimal Reserves; monetary authorities;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2679. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash). General contact details of provider: http://www.esocialsciences.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.