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Changing Comparative Advantages


  • Nicolini, Marcella

    () (ISLA, Bocconi University, Milan)


This paper inspects how comparative advantages have changed in the last 30 years. Using trade data on 197 countries over the period 1976- 2004, it provides evidence that comparative advantages are not static, but change over time. More interestingly, it shows the rise in relevance of institutional comparative advantage. Finally, it shows that this results does not hold for some countries (BRIC).

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolini, Marcella, 2008. "Changing Comparative Advantages," Papers DYNREG21, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:dynreg21
    Note: DYNREG Research Project – Dynamic Regions in a Knowledge-Driven Global Economy: Lessons and Policy Implications for the European Union

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Werner Antweiler & Daniel Trefler, 2002. "Increasing Returns and All That: A View from Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 93-119, March.
    2. Nathan Nunn, 2007. "Relationship-Specificity, Incomplete Contracts, and the Pattern of Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 569-600.
    3. John Romalis, 2004. "Factor Proportions and the Structure of Commodity Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 67-97, March.
    4. Andrei A. Levchenko, 2007. "Institutional Quality and International Trade," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(3), pages 791-819.
    5. J. M. C. Santos Silva & Silvana Tenreyro, 2006. "The Log of Gravity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 641-658, November.
    6. Eric J. Bartelsman & Wayne Gray, 1996. "The NBER Manufacturing Productivity Database," NBER Technical Working Papers 0205, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
    8. Alessandro Nicita & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2007. "Trade, Production, and Protection Database, 1976--2004," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(1), pages 165-171.
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