IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/erp/mzesxx/p0008.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Dynamic Representation: The Case of European Integration

Author

Listed:
  • Hermann Schmitt
  • Jacques Thomassen

Abstract

This paper asks two questions. First, why are party voters less favourable towards specific EU policies than party elites? Second, how does political representation of EU preferences actually work, is it an elite- or a mass-driven process? The data-sets of the European Election Studies 1979 and 1994 are analysed which involve both an elite and a mass survey component. In contrast to earlier research, it appears that political representation of EU preferences works rather well regarding the grand directions of policy making, and that party elites behave responsively in view of changing EU preferences among their voters

Suggested Citation

  • Hermann Schmitt & Jacques Thomassen, 2000. "Dynamic Representation: The Case of European Integration," MZES Working Papers 21, MZES.
  • Handle: RePEc:erp:mzesxx:p0008
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.mzes.uni-mannheim.de/publications/wp/erpa/wp-21.html
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.mzes.uni-mannheim.de/publications/wp/wp-21.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:cup:apsrev:v:74:y:1980:i:01:p:78-91_16 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Evans, Geoffrey, 1998. "Euroscepticism and Conservative Electoral Support: How an Asset Became a Liability," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(04), pages 573-590, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Wratil, 2015. "Democratic Responsiveness in the European Union: the Case of the Council," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 94, European Institute, LSE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    democracy; European elections; leadership; political parties; political representation;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:erp:mzesxx:p0008. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Melbeck). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/mzmande.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.