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The Flexible Forms of Employment and Working Conditions: Empirical Investigation from Tunisia

Listed author(s):
  • Ilham Haouas

    ()

    (University of Paris 1, Pantheon-Sorbonne, France)

  • Mahmoud Yagoubi
Registered author(s):

    We investigate the impact of flexible forms of employment on working conditions in Tunisia. The dataset used comes from a unique survey covering 2000 workers in Tunisia and providing information on individual workers for the year 2004. Flexible forms of employment include job rotation, team work, fixed-term contract, part-time, flexible work hours, week-end work, night work, and over-time work. Working conditions are captured by occupational injuries as well as indicators of mental strain. We find that workers involved in the flexible work practices faces a higher risk of work injuries and more mental strain than workers involved in a more traditional work organization.

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    Paper provided by Economic Research Forum in its series Working Papers with number 407.

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    Length: 17
    Date of creation: 06 Jan 2008
    Date of revision: 06 Jan 2008
    Publication status: Published by The Economic Research Forum (ERF)
    Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:407
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    1. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2004. "What's driving the new economy?: the benefits of workplace innovation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 97-116, 02.
    2. Ichniowski, Casey & Shaw, Kathryn & Prennushi, Giovanna, 1997. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity: A Study of Steel Finishing Lines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 291-313, June.
    3. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
    4. Philippe Askenazy & Eve Caroli, 2006. "Innovative work practices, information technologies and working conditions: evidence for France," EconomiX Working Papers 2006-2, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Defense, EconomiX.
    5. Paul Osterman, 1994. "How Common is Workplace Transformation and Who Adopts it?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(2), pages 173-188, January.
    6. David Fairris & Mark Brenner, 2001. "Workplace Transformation and the Rise in Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Is There a Connection?," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(1), pages 15-28, January.
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