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Global Value Chain Integration and Productivity: The Case of Turkish Manufacturing Firms

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  • Yilmaz Kiliçaslan

    (Anadolu University)

  • Ugur Aytun
  • Oytun Meçik

Abstract

In this study, we examine how firms’ positions (supplier, consumer, or both) in both global and domestic value chains (GVC andDVC) affect their productivity. This is said to be the first attempt in exploring the impact of integration of firms to the GVCs on productivity generation in Turkish manufacturing industry at the firm level. The analysis is based on firm level data obtained from Turkish Statistical Institute (TurkStat) and covers the period from 2003 to 2015. The data used in the analysis includes all firms employing 20 or more employees in Turkish manufacturing industry. Our findings based on both fixed-effects and GMM estimations show that while supplier position on domestic chain has negative effect on productivity, the same position in GVC vanishes this effect. Consumer position in the GVC, on the other hand, provide more benefits to SMEs than to large-scale firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Yilmaz Kiliçaslan & Ugur Aytun & Oytun Meçik, 2019. "Global Value Chain Integration and Productivity: The Case of Turkish Manufacturing Firms," Working Papers 1283, Economic Research Forum, revised 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:1283
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    References listed on IDEAS

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