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Aggregate hiring and the value of jobs along the business cycle

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  • Yashiv, Eran

Abstract

U.S. CPS data indicate that in recessions firms actually increase their hiring rates from the pools of the unemployed and out of the labor force. Why so? The paper provides an explanation by studying the optimal recruiting behavior of the representative firm. The model combines labor frictions, of the search and matching type, with capital frictions, of the q-model type. Optimal firm behavior is a function of the value of jobs, i.e., the expected present value of the marginal worker to the firm. These are estimated to be counter-cyclical, the underlying reason being the dynamic behavior of the labor share of GDP. The counter-cyclicality of hiring rates and job values, which may appear counter-intuitive, is shown to be consistent with well-known business cycle facts. The analysis emphasizes the difference between current labor productivity and the wider, forwardlooking concept of job values. The paper explains the high volatility of firm recruiting behavior, as well as the reduction over time in labor market fluidity in the U.S., using the same estimated model. Part of the explanation has to do with job values and another part with the interaction of hiring and investment costs, both determinants having been typically overlooked.

Suggested Citation

  • Yashiv, Eran, 2016. "Aggregate hiring and the value of jobs along the business cycle," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86175, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:86175
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/86175/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Faccini, Renato & Yashiv, Eran, 2016. "The Hiring Frictions and Price Frictions Nexus in Business Cycle Models," CEPR Discussion Papers 11639, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    counter-cyclical job values; business cycles; aggregate hiring; vacancies; labor market frictions; capital market frictions; volatility; labor market fluidity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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