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Linking Climate Change, Rice Yield and Migration: The Philippine Experience

  • Flordeliza H. Bordey

    ()

    (Philippine Rice Research Institute, Maligaya, Philippines)

  • Cheryll C. Launio

    ()

    (Socioeconomics Division, Philippine Rice Research Institute)

  • Eduardo Jimmy P. Quilang

    (Philippine Rice Research Institute, Maligaya, Philippines)

  • Charis Mae A. Tolentino

    (Philippine Rice Research Institute, Maligaya, Philippines)

  • Nimfa B. Ogena

    (Philippine Rice Research Institute, Maligaya, Philippines)

This study tests the hypothesis that climate change, through its rice productivity impacts, induces out-migration in the Philippines. Results show that climate change effects such as increasing night time temperature and extreme rainfall pattern, by way of reduction in rice yield and farm revenues, significantly increases the number of Overseas Filipino Workers. Findings also show that overseas migration of female workers is more sensitive to climate and rice productivity changes compared to male overseas migration. However, unlike overseas migration, the reduction in yield and farm revenues act as a constraint to domestic migration.

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File URL: http://www.eepsea.net/pub/rr/2013-RR10_Bordey.pdf
File Function: First version, 2013
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Paper provided by Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA) in its series EEPSEA Research Report with number rr2013033.

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Date of creation: Mar 2013
Date of revision: Mar 2013
Handle: RePEc:eep:report:rr2013033
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.eepsea.net

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  1. Olivier Desch´┐Żnes & Michael Greenstone, 2007. "The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Output and Random Fluctuations in Weather," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 354-385, March.
  2. Arief Anshory Yusuf & Herminia Francisco, 2009. "Climate Change Vulnerability Mapping for Southeast Asia," EEPSEA Special and Technical Paper tp200901s1, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Jan 2009.
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