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Price Indexation, Habit Formation, and the Generalized Taylor Principle

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  • Saroj Bhattarai
  • Jae Won Lee
  • Woong Yong Park

Abstract

We prove that the Generalized Taylor Principle, under which the nominal interest rate reacts more than one-for-one to inflation in the long run, is a necessary and (under some extra mild restrictions on parameters) sufficient condition for determinacy in a sticky price model with positive steady-state inflation, interest rate smoothing in monetary policy, partial dynamic price indexation, and habit formation in consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Saroj Bhattarai & Jae Won Lee & Woong Yong Park, 2013. "Price Indexation, Habit Formation, and the Generalized Taylor Principle," CAMA Working Papers 2013-52, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:camaaa:2013-52
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Saroj Bhattarai & Jae Won Lee & Woong Yong Park, 2016. "Policy Regimes, Policy Shifts, and U.S. Business Cycles," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(5), pages 968-983, December.
    2. Lubik, Thomas A. & Marzo, Massimiliano, 2007. "An inventory of simple monetary policy rules in a New Keynesian macroeconomic model," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 15-36.
    3. Benhabib, Jess & Eusepi, Stefano, 2005. "The design of monetary and fiscal policy: A global perspective," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 40-73, July.
    4. Carlstrom, Charles T. & Fuerst, Timothy S. & Ghironi, Fabio, 2006. "Does it matter (for equilibrium determinacy) what price index the central bank targets?," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 128(1), pages 214-231, May.
    5. Bullard, James & Mitra, Kaushik, 2002. "Learning about monetary policy rules," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1105-1129, September.
    6. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2011. "Monetary Policy, Trend Inflation, and the Great Moderation: An Alternative Interpretation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 341-370, February.
    7. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    8. Frank Smets & Rafael Wouters, 2007. "Shocks and Frictions in US Business Cycles: A Bayesian DSGE Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 586-606, June.
    9. Carlstrom, Charles T. & Fuerst, Timothy S., 2005. "Investment and interest rate policy: a discrete time analysis," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 4-20, July.
    10. Saroj Bhattarai & Jae Won Lee & Woong Yong Park, 2012. "Monetary-Fiscal Policy Interactions and Indeterminacy in Postwar US Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 173-178, May.
    11. Sveen, Tommy & Weinke, Lutz, 2007. "Firm-specific capital, nominal rigidities, and the Taylor principle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 729-737, September.
    12. Sveen, Tommy & Weinke, Lutz, 2005. "New perspectives on capital, sticky prices, and the Taylor principle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 21-39, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eo, Yunjong & Lie, Denny, 2018. "Changes in the Inflation Target and the Comovement between Inflation and the Nominal Interest Rate," Working Papers 2018-02, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised May 2020.
    2. Lubik, Thomas A. & Matthes, Christian, 2016. "Indeterminacy and learning: An analysis of monetary policy in the Great Inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 85-106.
    3. Liu, Ding & Sun, Weihong & Chang, Long, 2021. "Monetary–fiscal policy regime and macroeconomic dynamics in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 121-135.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Determinacy; Generalized Taylor Principle; Sticky prices; Price indexation; Habit formation; Steady-state inflation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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