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Entry Deterrence in Durable-Goods Monopoly

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Listed:
  • Heidrun C. Hoppe

    (Northwestern University)

  • In Ho Lee

    (University of Southampton)

Abstract

Some industries support Schumpeter's notion of creative destruction through innovative entrants. Others exhibit a single, persistent technological leadership. This paper explores a durable-goods monopolist threatened by entry via a new generation of the durable good. It is shown that the durability of the good either acts as an entry barrier itself or creates an opportunity for the incumbent firm to deter entry by limit pricing. As a consequence, the industry tends to remain monopolized, with successive generations of the durable good being introduced by the incumbent monopolist. We show that entry deterrence by limit pricing can lead to underinvestment in innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • Heidrun C. Hoppe & In Ho Lee, 2000. "Entry Deterrence in Durable-Goods Monopoly," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0610, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:wc2000:0610
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1999. "Pricing Under the Threat of Entry by a Sole Supplier of a Network Good," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1873, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    11. Carlton, Dennis W & Gertner, Robert, 1989. "Market Power and Mergers in Durable-Good Industries," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(2), pages 203-226, October.
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    13. Gilbert, Richard J & Newbery, David M G, 1982. "Preemptive Patenting and the Persistence of Monopoly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 514-526, June.
    14. Michael Waldman, 1993. "A New Perspective on Planned Obsolescence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 273-283.
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