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Reconsidering the Market Size Effect in Innovation and Growth

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  • Hélène Latzer
  • Kiminori Matsuyama
  • Mathieu Parenti

Abstract

In the standard horizontal innovation model of endogenous growth, larger economies innovate more and grow faster. Due to the homotheticity of preferences, however, it does not matter whether the large market size comes from a large population or a high per capita expenditure. In this paper, we extend the standard model to allow for nonhomothetic preferences. Among others, we show that, holding the size fixed, economies with higher per capita expenditure and smaller populations innovate more and grow faster for the empirically relevant case of incomplete pass-through, strategic complementarity in pricing, and procompetitive entry.

Suggested Citation

  • Hélène Latzer & Kiminori Matsuyama & Mathieu Parenti, 2019. "Reconsidering the Market Size Effect in Innovation and Growth," Working Papers ECARES 2019-31, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/298200
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Boucekkine, Raouf & Latzer, Hélène & Parenti, Mathieu, 2017. "Variable markups in the long-run: A generalization of preferences in growth models," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 80-86.
    2. Evgeny Zhelobodko & Sergey Kokovin & Mathieu Parenti & Jacques‐François Thisse, 2012. "Monopolistic Competition: Beyond the Constant Elasticity of Substitution," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(6), pages 2765-2784, November.
    3. Fontagné, Lionel & Martin, Philippe & Orefice, Gianluca, 2018. "The international elasticity puzzle is worse than you think," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 115-129.
    4. Jeffrey R. Campbell & Hugo A. Hopenhayn, 2005. "Market Size Matters," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 1-25, March.
    5. Mary Amiti & Oleg Itskhoki & Jozef Konings, 2019. "International Shocks, Variable Markups, and Domestic Prices," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 86(6), pages 2356-2402.
    6. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1993. "Innovation and Growth in the Global Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262570971, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Bertoletti & Federico Etro, 2022. "Monopolistic competition, as you like it," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 60(1), pages 293-319, January.
    2. Cavallari, Lilia & Etro, Federico, 2020. "Demand, markups and the business cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous growth; Balanced growth; Horizontal innovation; Nonhomothetic preferences; Directly explicitly additive (DEA) preferences; Demand composition; Incomplete pass-through; Strategic complementarity in pricing; Procompetitive entry; Competition and growth;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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