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The impact of stock spams on volatility

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  • Taoufik Bouraoui

Abstract

This paper is dedicated to study the impact of stock spams through the analysis of the variations of volatility. We use the methodology of event studies on a sample of hundred ten firms. The results show positive and significant changes in volatility during 12 days of the event window; a widening of the variation [lowest price - highest price] was noticed following the consignment of messages by the spammers. The sending of stock spams affected the behaviour of investors, indicating thus that the spamming activity is a lucrative business.

Suggested Citation

  • Taoufik Bouraoui, 2009. "The impact of stock spams on volatility," EconomiX Working Papers 2009-30, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
  • Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2009-30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Koski, Jennifer Lynch, 1998. "Measurement Effects and the Variance of Returns after Stock Splits and Stock Dividends," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 11(1), pages 143-162.
    2. Parkinson, Michael, 1980. "The Extreme Value Method for Estimating the Variance of the Rate of Return," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 61-65, January.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/9849 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Sandy Campart & Étienne Pfister, 2008. "Course technologique et valeur boursière. Une étude d'événements basée sur l'industrie pharmaceutique," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 59(2), pages 307-329.
    5. Pindyck, Robert S, 1984. "Risk, Inflation, and the Stock Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 335-351, June.
    6. Hanke, Michael & Hauser, Florian, 2008. "On the effects of stock spam e-mails," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 57-83, February.
    7. French, Kenneth R. & Schwert, G. William & Stambaugh, Robert F., 1987. "Expected stock returns and volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 3-29, September.
    8. A. Craig MacKinlay, 1997. "Event Studies in Economics and Finance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 13-39, March.
    9. Giaccotto, Carmelo & Sfiridis, James M., 1996. "Hypothesis testing in event studies: The case of variance changes," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 349-370, October.
    10. Harris, Lawrence, 1987. "Transaction Data Tests of the Mixture of Distributions Hypothesis," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(02), pages 127-141, June.
    11. Gallant, A Ronald & Rossi, Peter E & Tauchen, George, 1992. "Stock Prices and Volume," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 199-242.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Stock spams work
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2009-10-19 19:50:00

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    Cited by:

    1. ap Gwilym, O. & Kita, A. & Wang, Q., 2014. "Speculate against speculative demand," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 212-221.
    2. Taoufik Bouraoui, 2015. "The effect of reducing quantitative easing on emerging markets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(15), pages 1562-1573, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stock spam; event studies; volatility; penny stock;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General

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