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Housing Decisions, Family Types and Gender: A Look across LIS Countries

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  • Mariacristina Rossi
  • Eva Sierminska

Abstract

In this paper we shall examine homeownership trends over the past 3 to 4 decades and discuss differences related to the homeownership gap for women and men, with a focus on most recent trends. We shall compare differences in the US to those in countries with different institutional structures and shall pay particular attention to differences across family types. Our estimation techniques will allow us to discuss the role of determinants from a gender perspective. We find that single women are better off than single men without children and a reverse trend exists in families with children. The general negative effect for women remains for younger cohorts in the face of risking homeownership. The latest crisis did not change the general long-running trend of the homeownership gap except for the US and France. The findings of this paper could provide an international perspective on differential homeownership rates among women and men, across countries and over time. Given that the value of one’s own home (home equity) is the largest financial reserve in a household’s wealth portfolio, it is important to have a better understanding of the differences resulting from gender and family types.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariacristina Rossi & Eva Sierminska, 2015. "Housing Decisions, Family Types and Gender: A Look across LIS Countries," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 815, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp815
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wenli Li & Fang Yang, 2010. "American dream or American obsession? The economic benefits and costs of homeownership," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 20-30.
    2. Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "A Conjecture on the Explanation for High Unemployment in the Industrialized Nations: Part I," Economic Research Papers 268744, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    3. Riccardo Calcagno & Mariacristina Rossi, 2011. "Portfolio Choice and Precautionary Savings," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(2), pages 1353-1361.
    4. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    5. Marianna Brunetti & Elena Giarda & Costanza Torricelli, 2016. "Is Financial Fragility a Matter of Illiquidity? An Appraisal for Italian Households," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(4), pages 628-649, December.
    6. Gabriel, Stuart A. & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2013. "Urbanization, agglomeration economies, and access to mortgage credit," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 42-50.
    7. Donald R. Haurin & Toby L. Parcel & R. Jean Haurin, 2002. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 635-666.
    8. Marianna Brunetti & Elena Giarda & Costanza Torricelli, 2016. "Is Financial Fragility a Matter of Illiquidity? An Appraisal for Italian Households," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(4), pages 628-649, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Housing; Wealth; Gender; homeownership; time trends;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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