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The Socio-Economic Module of the Berlin Aging Study II (SOEP-BASE): Description, Structure, and Questionnaire

Author

Listed:
  • Anke Böckenhoff
  • Denise Saßenroth
  • Martin Kroh
  • Thomas Siedler
  • Peter Eibich
  • Gert G. Wagner

Abstract

The Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II) is a multidisciplinary study that allows for the investigation of how a multitude of health status factors as well as many other social and economic outcomes interplay. The sample consists of 1,600 participants aged 60 to 80, and 600 participants aged 20 to 35. The socio-economic part of BASE-II, the so called SOEP-BASE, is conducted by the SOEP Group at the DIW Berlin. The surveyed socio-economic variables are fully comparable with the variables of the long running German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP), which increases the analytical power of BASE-II. The socio-economic data collected on the individual and on the household level are enriched with geo-referenced context data ("neighbourhood data") in order to disentangle the interplay between individual, societal and regional determinants on individuals' health status and other outcome variables. Furthermore, as the BASE-II study is based on a convenience sample, the SOEP Group at the DIW provides weights for the BASE-II dataset that correct for selectivity bias.

Suggested Citation

  • Anke Böckenhoff & Denise Saßenroth & Martin Kroh & Thomas Siedler & Peter Eibich & Gert G. Wagner, 2013. "The Socio-Economic Module of the Berlin Aging Study II (SOEP-BASE): Description, Structure, and Questionnaire," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 568, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp568
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.424996.de/diw_sp0568.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Richter & Jürgen Schupp, 2012. "SOEP Innovation Sample (SOEP-IS): Description, Structure and Documentation," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 463, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Jan Goebel & C. Katharina Spieß & Nils R. J. Witte & Susanne Gerstenberg, 2007. "Die Verknüpfung des SOEP mit MICROM-Indikatoren: Der MICROM-SOEP Datensatz," Data Documentation 26, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Thomas Siedler & JÜrgen Schupp & C. Katharina Spiess & Gert G. Wagner, 2009. "The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) as Reference Data Set," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 367-374.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. #HEJC papers for September 2013
      by academichealtheconomists in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-09-01 04:01:38

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Kroh & Denise Lüdtke & Sandra Düzel & Florin Winter, 2016. "Response Error in a Web Survey and a Mailed Questionnaire: The Role of Cognitive Functioning," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 888, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Simon Kühne & Martin Kroh, 2016. "Using Personalized Feedback to Increase Data Quality and Respondents' Motivation in Web Surveys?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 855, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cohort Study; Berlin Aging Study; BASE-II; SOEP;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • Y80 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Related Disciplines - - - Related Disciplines
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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