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Patterns of childbearing in Russia 1994 - 1998

Author

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  • Annette Kohlmann

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Sergej M. Zuev

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the determinants of births in Russia in the 1990s and the changes in their effects since the 1980s and factors influencing fertility intentions in the 1990s. In the first part, based on the current social and economic situation in Russia, specific hypotheses for different parities (realized and intended fertility) are developed and subsequently tested by using logistic regression methods. On the basis of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) we find that the social differentiation that took place in Russia in the 1990s resulted in an increasing importance of economic conditions for a first, second or third birth. The same applies to parity-specific intentions.

Suggested Citation

  • Annette Kohlmann & Sergej M. Zuev, 2001. "Patterns of childbearing in Russia 1994 - 1998," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-018, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2001-018
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2001-018.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Lokshin, 2004. "Household Childcare Choices and Women’s Work Behavior in Russia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    2. Lokshin, Michael & Harris, Kathleen Mullan & Popkin, Barry M., 2000. "Single Mothers in Russia: Household Strategies for Coping with Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2183-2198, December.
    3. Hans-Peter Kohler & Iliana Kohler, 2001. "Fertility decline in Russia after 1990: the role of economic uncertainty and labor market crises," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hans-Peter Kohler & Iliana Kohler, 2001. "Fertility decline in Russia after 1990: the role of economic uncertainty and labor market crises," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
    3. Francesco C. Billari & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2002. "Patterns of lowest-low fertility in Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-040, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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