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Suppliers of multinationals and the forced linkage effect: Evidence from firm level data


  • Godart, Olivier
  • Görg, Holger


Using information on more than 1000 firms in a number of emerging countries, we find quantitative evidence that suppliers of multinationals that are pressured by their customers to reduce production costs or develop new products have higher productivity growth than other firms, including other host country suppliers of multinationals. These findings provide first empirical support for a “forced linkage effect” from supplying multinational companies. Our findings hold controlling for other factors within and outside the supplier- customer relationship and when endogeneity concerns are taken into consideration.

Suggested Citation

  • Godart, Olivier & Görg, Holger, 2013. "Suppliers of multinationals and the forced linkage effect: Evidence from firm level data," CEPR Discussion Papers 9324, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9324

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Javorcik, Beata & Lo Turco, Alessia & Maggioni, Daniela, 2017. "New and Improved: Does FDI Boost Production Complexity in Host Countries?," CEPR Discussion Papers 11942, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Davide Castellani & Maria Mancusi & Grazia Santangelo & Antonello Zanfei, 2015. "Exploring the links between offshoring and innovation," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 42(1), pages 1-7, March.
    3. Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley & Stefan Hoffmann and Adnan Seric, 2016. "When do multinational companies consider corporate social responsibility? A multi-country study in Sub-Saharan Africa," RSCAS Working Papers 2016/03, European University Institute.
    4. Ron Bird & Francesco Momenté & Francesco Reggiani, 2012. "The market acceptance of corporate social responsibility: a comparison across six countries/regions," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 37(2), pages 153-168, August.
    5. Bassetti, Thomas & Dal Maso, Lorenzo & Lattanzi, Nicola, 2015. "Family businesses in Eastern European countries: How informal payments affect exports," Journal of Family Business Strategy, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 219-233.
    6. Ha, Yoo Jung & Giroud, Axèle, 2015. "Competence-creating subsidiaries and FDI technology spillovers," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 605-614.
    7. repec:bla:jomstd:v:54:y:2017:i:5:p:583-612 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Holger Görg & Adnan Seric, 2016. "Linkages with Multinationals and Domestic Firm Performance: The Role of Assistance for Local Firms," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(4), pages 605-624, September.
    9. Görg, Holger & Seric, Adnan, 2013. "With a little help from my friends: Supplying to multinationals, buying from multinationals, and domestic firm performance," Kiel Working Papers 1867, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    More about this item


    backward linkages; forced linkage; multinational customers; productivity spillovers; suppliers;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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