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A Note on The Drivers of R&D Intensity

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  • Mathieu, Azèle
  • van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, Bruno

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the extent to which technological specialization influences the observed R&D intensity of countries. The econometric analysis performed on a cross-country cross-industry panel dataset (21 industrial sectors, 18 countries, from 2001 to 2004) suggests that accounting for the technological specialisation of countries substantially affect the traditional country ranking. The exceptions are Sweden, The United States, France and Japan, which have an ‘above-than-average’ R&D intensity in most industries, as compared to the 14 other countries. The high level of R&D intensity of South Korea and Finland, for instance, is essentially due to their specialisation in R&D-intensive industries, and not to a macroeconomic environment particularly favourable to R&D.

Suggested Citation

  • Mathieu, Azèle & van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, Bruno, 2008. "A Note on The Drivers of R&D Intensity," CEPR Discussion Papers 6684, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6684
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pradhan, Jaya Prakash, 2011. "Regional heterogeneity and firms’ innovation: the role of regional factors in industrial R&D in India," MPRA Paper 28096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Raquel Ortega-Argilés & Mariacristina Piva & Marco Vivarelli, 2014. "The transatlantic productivity gap: Is R&D the main culprit?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1342-1371, November.
    3. Peter Voigt & Pietro Moncada-Paternò-Castello, 2012. "Can Fast Growing R&D-Intensive Smes Affect the Economic Structure of the Eu Economy?: A Projection to the Year 2020," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 2(2), pages 96-128, December.
    4. Raquel Ortega-Argiles & Mariacristina Piva & Lesley Potters & Marco Vivarelli, 2009. "Is corporate R&D investment in high-tech sectors more effective? Some guidelines for European research policy," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-038, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    5. Alex Coad & Antonio Vezzani, 2017. "Manufacturing the future: is the manufacturing sector a driver of R&D, exports and productivity growth?," JRC Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2017-06, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    6. Pietro Moncada-Paternò-Castello, 2016. "Sector dynamics and demographics of top R&D firms in the global economy," JRC Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2016-06, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    7. Federico Biagi & Juraj Stančík, 2012. "Characterizing the evolution of the EU R&D intensity gap using data from top R&D performers," ERSA conference papers ersa12p321, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Janger, Jürgen & Schubert, Torben & Andries, Petra & Rammer, Christian & Hoskens, Machteld, 2017. "The EU 2020 innovation indicator: A step forward in measuring innovation outputs and outcomes?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 30-42.
    9. Gehrke, Birgit & Schasse, Ulrich & Gulden, Vivien-Sophie & Leidmann, Mark, 2017. "Folgen des wirtschaftlichen Strukturwandels für die langfristige Entwicklung der FuE-Intensität im internationalen Vergleich," Studien zum deutschen Innovationssystem 8-2017, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin.
    10. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2012. "The Transatlantic Productivity Gap: A Survey Of The Main Causes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 395-419, July.
    11. Mario Coccia, 2012. "Path-breaking innovations for lung cancer: a revolution in clinical practice," CERIS Working Paper 201201, Institute for Economic Research on Firms and Growth - Moncalieri (TO) ITALY -NOW- Research Institute on Sustainable Economic Growth - Moncalieri (TO) ITALY.
    12. Pietro Moncada-Paternò-Castello & Peter Voigt, 2010. "Proceedings of CONCORD 2010: 2nd European Conference on Corporate R&D "An Engine for Growth, a Challenge for European Policy". Academic Forum - Summary Report," JRC Working Papers JRC60863, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    13. Lööf, Hans & Savin, Maxim, 2012. "Cross-country difference in R&D productivity Comparison of 11 European economies," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 294, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, revised 13 Mar 2013.
    14. Pietro Moncada-Paternò-Castello & Peter Voigt, 2012. "Projection of R&D-intensive enterprise growth to the year 2020: Implications for EU policy?," JRC Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2012-01, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    15. Polt, Wolfgang & Berger, Martin & Boekholt, Patries & Cremers, Katrin & Egeln, Jürgen & Gassler, Helmut & Hofer, Reinhold & Rammer, Christian & Deuten, Jasper & Good, Barbara & Warta, Katharina, 2010. "Das deutsche Forschungs- und Innovationssystem: Ein internationaler Sytemvergleich zur Rolle von Wissenschaft, Interaktionen und Governance für die technologische Leistungsfähigkeit," Studien zum deutschen Innovationssystem 11-2010, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin.
    16. Moncada-Paternò-Castello, Pietro & Ciupagea, Constantin & Smith, Keith & Tübke, Alexander & Tubbs, Mike, 2010. "Does Europe perform too little corporate R&D? A comparison of EU and non-EU corporate R&D performance," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 523-536, May.
    17. B. Robert, 2008. "Innovation and entrepreneurship: structural determinants of competitiveness," Economic Review, National Bank of Belgium, issue iv, pages 61-83, December.
    18. Philip McCann & Ortega Ortega-Argilés, 2014. "The Role of the Smart Specialisation Agenda in a Reformed EU Cohesion Policy," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(1), pages 15-32.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    high-tech industries; Lisbon agenda; R&D intensity; Science and technology policies;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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