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The Gambler's and Hot-Hand Fallacies: Theory and Applications

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  • Rabin, Matthew
  • Vayanos, Dimitri

Abstract

We develop a model of the gambler's fallacy -- the mistaken belief that random sequences should exhibit systematic reversals. We show that an individual who holds this belief and observes a sequence of signals can exaggerate the magnitude of changes in an underlying state but underestimate their duration. When the state is constant, and so signals are \textit{i.i.d.}, the individual can predict that long streaks of similar signals will continue -- a hot-hand fallacy. When signals are serially correlated, the individual typically under-reacts to short streaks, over-reacts to longer ones, and under-reacts to very long ones. We explore several applications, showing, for example, that investors may move assets too much in and out of mutual funds, and exaggerate the value of financial information and expertise.

Suggested Citation

  • Rabin, Matthew & Vayanos, Dimitri, 2007. "The Gambler's and Hot-Hand Fallacies: Theory and Applications," CEPR Discussion Papers 6081, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6081
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ravi Jagannathan & Alexey Malakhov & Dmitry Novikov, 2010. "Do Hot Hands Exist among Hedge Fund Managers? An Empirical Evaluation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(1), pages 217-255, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    behavioural finance; gambler's fallacy; hot-hand fallacy;

    JEL classification:

    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets

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