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The Transmission of Shocks in EndogenousFinancial Networks: A Structural Approach

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  • Heipertz, Jonas
  • Ouazad, Amine
  • Rancière, Romain

Abstract

The paper uses bank- and instrument-level data on asset holdings and liabilities to identify and estimate a general equilibrium model of trade in financial instruments. Bilateral ties are formed as each bank selects the size and the diversification of its assets and liabilities. Shocks propagate due to the response, rather than the size, of bilateral ties to such shocks. This general equilibrium propagation of shocks reveals a financial network where the strength of a tie is determined by the sensitivity of an instrument's return to other instruments' returns. General equilibrium analysis predicts the propagation of real, financial and policy shocks. The network's shape adjusts endogenously in response to shocks, to either amplify or mitigate partial equilibrium shocks. The network exhibits key theoretical properties: (i) more connected networks lead to less amplification of partial equilibrium shocks, (ii)Â the influence of a bank's equity is independent of the size of its holdings; (ii) more risk-averse banks are more diversified, lowering their own volatility but increasing their influence on other banks. The general equilibrium based network model is structurally estimated on disaggregated data for the universe of French banks. We used the estimated network to assess the effects of ECB quantitative easing policy on asset prices, balance-sheets, individual bank distress risk, and networks systemicness.

Suggested Citation

  • Heipertz, Jonas & Ouazad, Amine & Rancière, Romain, 2019. "The Transmission of Shocks in EndogenousFinancial Networks: A Structural Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 13855, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13855
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Amine Ouazad & Matthew E. Kahn, 2019. "Mortgage Finance and Climate Change: Securitization Dynamics in the Aftermath of Natural Disasters," NBER Working Papers 26322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asset and Liability Management; Asset Trade; Endogenous Networks; General Equilibrium;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • D5 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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