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Evidence of induced innovation in US sectoral Capital´s shares


  • Andrew T. Young


  • Hernando Zuleta


  • Andrés F. García-Suaza



We use annual data on capital´s share and relative factor prices from 35 US industriesfrom 1960 to 2005 to test the induced innovation hypothesis. We derive, from a productionfunction framework, testable implications for the effect of contemporaneous and lagged factorprice ratios on capital´s share of production. The predicted effect is positive or negativedepending on the elasticity of substitution between labor and capital. From panel regressions, theestimated effect of the contemporaneous factor price ratio implies an elasticity of substitutionthat is less than unity, consistent with the consensus from the literature. Based on this, ournegative estimated effects for lagged price ratios are both statistically significant and consistentwith the induced innovation hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew T. Young & Hernando Zuleta & Andrés F. García-Suaza, 2010. "Evidence of induced innovation in US sectoral Capital´s shares," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 006740, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000092:006740

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Directed Technical Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 781-809.
    2. Bental, Benjamin & Demougin, Dominique, 2008. "Do factor shares reflect technology?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1329-1334, September.
    3. Robert Chirinko & Steven M. Fazzari & Andrew P. Meyer, 2002. "That Elusive Elasticity: A Long-panel Approach to Estimating the Price Sensitivity of Business Capital," Emory Economics 0202, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
    4. Hernando Zuleta, 2008. "An empirical note on factor shares," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 379-390.
    5. David Popp, 2002. "Induced Innovation and Energy Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 160-180, March.
    6. Ricardo J. Caballero & Eduardo M. R. A. Engel & John C. Haltiwanger, 1995. "Plant-Level Adjustment and Aggregate Investment Dynamics," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(2), pages 1-54.
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    Cited by:

    1. Punzi, Maria Teresa & Rabitsch, Katrin, 2015. "Investor borrowing heterogeneity in a Kiyotaki–Moore style macro model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 75-79.
    2. Devereux, Michael B. & Sutherland, Alan, 2011. "Evaluating international financial integration under leverage constraints," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 427-442, April.
    3. Knoblach, Michael & Rößler, Martin & Zwerschke, Patrick, 2016. "The Elasticity of Factor Substitution Between Capital and Labor in the U.S. Economy: A Meta-Regression Analysis," CEPIE Working Papers 03/16, Technische Universität Dresden, Center of Public and International Economics (CEPIE).
    4. Carlos Esteban Posada P., 2013. "Los efectos macroeconómicos de la política fiscal y del cambio técnico: predicciones de un modelo de equilibrio general dinámico," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 011459, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

    More about this item


    induced innovation; biased technical change; capital´s share; labor´s share; elasticityof substitution;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production

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