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Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities

Author

Listed:
  • Almut Balleer
  • Nikolay Hristov
  • Dominik Menno

Abstract

This paper investigates how financial market imperfections and the frequency of price adjustment interact. Based on new firm-level evidence for Germany, we document that financially constrained firms adjust prices more often than their unconstrained counterparts, both upwards and downwards. We show that these empirical patterns are consistent with a partial equilibrium menu-cost model with a working capital constraint. We then use the model to show how the presence of financial frictions changes profits and the price distribution of firms compared to a model without financial frictions. Our results suggest that tighter financial constraints are associated with lower nominal rigidities, higher prices and lower output. Moreover, in response to aggregate shocks, aggregate price rigidity moves substantially, the response of inflation is dampened, while output reacts more in the presence of financial frictions. This means that financial frictions make the aggregate supply curve flatter for all calibrations considered in our model. We show that this differs fundamentally from models in which the extensive margin of price adjustment is absent (Rotemberg, 1982) or constant (Calvo, 1983). Hence, the interaction of financial frictions and the frequency of price adjustment potentially induces important consequences for the effectiveness of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Almut Balleer & Nikolay Hristov & Dominik Menno, 2017. "Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities," CESifo Working Paper Series 6309, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6309
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp6309.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simon Gilchrist & Raphael Schoenle & Jae Sim & Egon Zakrajšek, 2017. "Inflation Dynamics during the Financial Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(3), pages 785-823, March.
    2. Rebekka Christopoulou & Philip Vermeulen, 2012. "Markups in the Euro area and the US over the period 1981–2004: a comparison of 50 sectors," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 53-77, February.
    3. Bachmann, Rüdiger & Born, Benjamin & Elstner, Steffen & Grimme, Christian, 2013. "Time-Varying Business Volatility, Price Setting, and the Real Effects of Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 9702, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Strasser, Georg, 2013. "Exchange rate pass-through and credit constraints," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 25-38.
    5. Bhaskar, V & Machin, Stephen & Reid, Gavin C, 1993. "Price and Quantity Adjustment over the Business Cycle: Evidence from Survey Data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(2), pages 257-268, April.
    6. Guerrieri, Luca & Iacoviello, Matteo, 2015. "OccBin: A toolkit for solving dynamic models with occasionally binding constraints easily," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 22-38.
    7. Nannan Lundin & Lihong Yun, 2009. "International Trade and Inter-Industry Wage Structure in Swedish Manufacturing: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 87-102, February.
    8. Robert J. Barro, 1972. "A Theory of Monopolistic Price Adjustment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(1), pages 17-26.
    9. Joseph Vavra, 2014. "Inflation Dynamics and Time-Varying Volatility: New Evidence and an Ss Interpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(1), pages 215-258.
    10. repec:oup:qjecon:v:129:y:2013:i:1:p:215-258 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Michael Kleemann & Manuel Wiegand, 2014. "Are Real Effects of Credit Supply Overestimated? Bias from Firms' Current Situation and Future Expectations," ifo Working Paper Series 192, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    frequency of price adjustment; financial frictions; menu cost model;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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