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The Globalization Paradox Revisited

  • Gregor Schwerhoff
  • Ottmar Edenhofer

According to the Globalization Paradox, globalization limits the freedom of choice for national governments. Capital mobility in particular induces tax competition, thus putting downward pressure on capital taxes. However, while capital mobility introduces the inefficiency of tax competition, it makes the allocation of capital more efficient. Whether national welfare and tax-financed public good provision increase or decrease through capital mobility depends on country characteristics. These characteristics include the relative capital endowment, the availability of taxes on fixed factors such as land and the preference for the public good. We compare the two second best settings of a closed economy and an economy with capital mobility to show that the relative capital endowment determines whether the net effect of capital mobility is positive. Fixed factor taxes have the potential to improve welfare by defusing the globalization trilemma through a reduction in the need for capital taxation.

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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 4878.

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Date of creation: 2014
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4878
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  1. Wilson, John Douglas, 1991. "Tax competition with interregional differences in factor endowments," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 423-451, November.
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  8. Bretschger, Lucas & Hettich, Frank, 2000. "Globalisation, capital mobility and tax competition: Theory and evidence for OECD countries," Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Diskussionspapiere 07/2000, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Faculty of Law and Economics.
  9. Marco Runkel & Thomas Eichner, 2010. "Interjurisdictional Spillovers, Decentralized Policymaking and the Elasticity of Capital Supply," FEMM Working Papers 100019, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
  10. Hikaru Ogawa & David Wildasin, 2007. "Think Locally, Act Locally: Spillovers, Spillbacks, and Efficient Decentralized Policymaking," Working Papers 2007-06, University of Kentucky, Institute for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations.
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  12. Devereux, Michael P. & Lockwood, Ben & Redoano, Michela, 2002. "Do Countries Compete over Corporate Tax Rates?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3400, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Rodrik, Dani, 2011. "The Globalization Paradox: Why Global Markets, States, and Democracy Can't Coexist," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199603336, March.
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  15. Hoyt, William H., 1991. "Property taxation, Nash equilibrium, and market power," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 123-131, July.
  16. Liberati, Paolo, 2007. "Trade openness, capital openness and government size," MPRA Paper 44371, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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  18. Oliver Lorz & Frank Stähler, 2001. "Who is afraid of capital mobility? on taxation of labor income and the level of public services in an open economy," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 74(1), pages 79-101, February.
  19. Chamley, Christophe, 1986. "Optimal Taxation of Capital Income in General Equilibrium with Infinite Lives," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(3), pages 607-22, May.
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