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Measuring the Integration of Staple Food Markets in Sub-Saharan Africa: Heterogeneous Infrastructure and Cross Border Trade in the East African Community

  • Rico Ihle
  • Stephan von Cramon-Taubadel
  • Sergiy Zorya

This analysis employs cointegration methods and semiparametric regression in order to assess the integration of maize markets and the factors determining national and cross-national transmission of price signals in Sub-Saharan Africa. We use a rich dataset of 16 series of wholesale maize prices between 2000 and 2008 for Kenya, Tanzanian and Uganda. Distance is shown to have a significant nonlinear impact on the transmission of information - modelled using a semi-parametric partially linear model. Border effects are found to be heterogeneous. The empirical results provide strong evidence that the Tanzanian market is isolated from the rest of East Africa and internally fragmented.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2011/wp-cesifo-2011-04/cesifo1_wp3413.pdf
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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 3413.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3413
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  1. Matthias Helble, 2006. "Border Effect Estimates for France and Germany Combining International Trade and Intra-national Transport Flows," IHEID Working Papers 13-2006, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, revised Jun 2006.
  2. Chen, Natalie, 2002. "Intra-national versus International Trade in the European Union: Why do National Borders Matter?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3407, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Carolyn L. Evans, 2003. "The Economic Significance of National Border Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1291-1312, September.
  4. Mahbub Morshed, A. K. M., 2003. "What can we learn from a large border effect in developing countries?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 353-369, October.
  5. McCallum, John, 1995. "National Borders Matter: Canada-U.S. Regional Trade Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 615-23, June.
  6. T. S. Jayne & Robert J. Myers & James Nyoro, 2008. "The effects of NCPB marketing policies on maize market prices in Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 313-325, 05.
  7. Feenstra, Robert C, 2002. "Border Effects and the Gravity Equation: Consistent Methods for Estimation," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(5), pages 491-506, December.
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