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Collective Labor Supply of Native Dutch and Immigrant Households in the Netherlands

  • Chris Van Klaveren
  • Bernard M.S. Van Praag
  • Henriette Maassen van den Brink

We estimate a collective time allocation model, where Dutch, Surinamese/Antillean and Turkish households behave as if both spouses maximize a household utility function. We assume that paid labor and housework are the endogenous choice variables and furthermore consider household production. Surinamese/Antillean and Turkish women differ from Dutch women because they value (joint) household production more in their utility function. Surinamese/Antillean and Turkish men, on the other hand, value joint household production less then Dutch men. Turkish households are the more traditional households, in the sense that the woman is more oriented on household production, while the man is oriented on paid labor. It is often believed that the bargaining power of women in more traditional households is relatively low, but our estimation results do not support this idea. In general, the wage elasticities of Dutch, Turkish and Surinamese/Antillean households are comparable. Men and women replace housework hours by paid labor if their hourly wage rate increases but do the opposite when the hourly wage rate of the partner increases.

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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 2872.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2872
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  1. Duncan Thomas, 1990. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 635-664.
  2. Chris Klaveren & Bernard Praag & Henriette Maassen van den Brink, 2008. "A public good version of the collective household model: an empirical approach with an application to British household data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 169-191, June.
  3. Jennifer Ward-Batts, 2003. "Out of the Wallet and into the Purse: Using Micro Data to Test Income Pooling," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2003-10, Claremont Colleges.
  4. Vermeulen, Frederic, 2002. " Collective Household Models: Principles and Main Results," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(4), pages 533-64, September.
  5. Kooreman, P. & Kapteyn, A.J., 1984. "Estimation of rationed and unrationed household labor supply functions using flexible functional forms," Research Memorandum FEW 157, School of Economics and Management.
  6. Martin Browning & Pierre-André Chiappori & Valérie Lechene, 2004. "Collective and Unitary Models: a Clarification," CAM Working Papers 2004-15, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  7. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-3106943 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Booth, Alison L. & van Ours, Jan C., 2007. "Job satisfaction and family happiness: the part-time work puzzle," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-20, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  9. Fortin, Bernard & Lacroix, Guy, 1997. "A Test of the Unitary and Collective Models of Household Labour Supply," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(443), pages 933-55, July.
  10. Michiel Evers & Ruud de Mooij & Daniel van Vuuren, 2005. "What explains the variation in estimates of labour supply elasticities?," CPB Discussion Paper 51, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  11. Wales, T. J. & Woodland, A. D., 1983. "Estimation of consumer demand systems with binding non-negativity constraints," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 263-285, April.
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