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Why do Low- and High-Skill Workers Migrate? Flow Evidence from France

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  • Dominique M. Gross
  • Nicolas Schmitt

Abstract

With a focus on the role of cultural clustering and income distribution, this paper investigates whether standard determinants influence international migration of workers to France with the same intensity across different skill levels and with or without free mobility. We find that low-skill migrants respond to most push and pull migration factors. High-skill migrants however respond only to financial incentives and cultural clustering does not matter. Migration policy is effective at controlling flows of low-skill migrants but free mobility has no impact on high-skill flows. Hence, France must rely on growing earnings and skill-premium to attract high-skill workers from high income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Dominique M. Gross & Nicolas Schmitt, 2006. "Why do Low- and High-Skill Workers Migrate? Flow Evidence from France," CESifo Working Paper Series 1797, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1797
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Laszlo Lorincz & Brigitta Nemeth, 2019. "Network Effects in Internal Migration," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 1913, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
    2. Sona Schovankova, 2013. "Determinants of the Spatial Distribution of Foreign Empolyees on Different Skilled Positions: The Case of the Czech Republic," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 2, pages 115-139, June.
    3. Daniëlle Bertrand-Cloodt & Frank Cörvers & Hans Heijke, 2017. "Ability, Academic Climate, and Going Abroad for Work or Pursuing a PhD," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(1), pages 119-140.
    4. Mancinelli, Susanna & Mazzanti, Massimiliano & Piva, Nora & Ponti, Giovanni, 2010. "Education, reputation or network? Evidence on migrant workers employability," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 64-71, January.

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