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The Importance of Geographic Access for the Impact of Microfinance

Listed author(s):
  • Nargiza Alimukhamedova
  • Randall K. Filer
  • Jan Hanousek

The geographic distance between a household and financial institutions may constitute a significant obstacle to achieving the benefits of modern financial institutions. We measure the impact of distance-related access to microcredits in Uzbekistan. Residents living closer to microfinance institutions are propensity score matched to those further away using both household and village characteristics. Households located nearer to microfinance institutions have larger businesses in terms of income, profits and employees than similar households located further away. In addition, they spend more on most forms of consumption and have greater savings.

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File URL: http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp577.pdf
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Paper provided by The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague in its series CERGE-EI Working Papers with number wp577.

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Date of creation: Nov 2016
Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp577
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  6. Matthieu Chemin, 2008. "The Benefits and Costs of Microfinance: Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 463-484, April.
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  8. Katsushi S. Imai & MD. Shafiul Azam, 2011. "Does Microfinance Reduce Poverty in Bangladesh? New Evidence from Household Panel Data," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(5), pages 633-653, October.
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  14. Becchetti, Leonardo & Castriota, Stefano, 2011. "Does Microfinance Work as a Recovery Tool After Disasters? Evidence from the 2004 Tsunami," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 898-912, June.
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  16. Sarah Pearlman, 2012. "Too Vulnerable for Microfinance? Risk and Vulnerability as Determinants of Microfinance Selection in Lima," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(9), pages 1342-1359, September.
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  19. Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo & Rachel Glennerster & Cynthia Kinnan, 2015. "The Miracle of Microfinance? Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 22-53, January.
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  22. World Bank, 2008. "Finance for All? Policies and Pitfalls in Expanding Access," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6905, September.
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