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Development of Survey Questions on Robotics Expenditures and Use in U.S. Manufacturing Establishments

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine Buffington
  • Javier Miranda
  • Robert Seamans

Abstract

The U.S. Census Bureau in partnership with a team of external researchers developed a series of questions on the use of robotics in U.S. manufacturing establishments. The questions include: (1) capital expenditures for new and used industrial robotic equipment in 2018, (2) number of industrial robots in operation in 2018, and (3) number of industrial robots purchased in 2018. These questions are to be included in the 2018 Annual Survey of Manufactures. This paper documents the background and cognitive testing process used for the development of these questions.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Buffington & Javier Miranda & Robert Seamans, 2018. "Development of Survey Questions on Robotics Expenditures and Use in U.S. Manufacturing Establishments," Working Papers 18-44, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:18-44
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    File URL: https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2018/CES-WP-18-44.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Georg Graetz & Guy Michaels, 2018. "Robots at Work," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(5), pages 753-768, December.
    2. Adela Luque & Javier Miranda, 2000. "Technology Use and Worker Outcomes: Direct Evidence from Linked Employee-Employer Data," Working Papers 00-13, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nikolas Zolas & Zachary Kroff & Erik Brynjolfsson & Kristina McElheran & David N. Beede & Cathy Buffington & Nathan Goldschlag & Lucia Foster & Emin Dinlersoz, 2020. "Advanced Technologies Adoption and Use by U.S. Firms: Evidence from the Annual Business Survey," NBER Working Papers 28290, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2020. "Heterogeneous Relationships between Automation Technologies and Skilled Labor: Evidence from a Firm Survey," Discussion papers 20004, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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