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Exploring Differences in Employment between Household and Establishment Data

Author

Listed:
  • Katharine Abraham
  • John Haltiwanger
  • Kristin Sandusky
  • James Spletzer

Abstract

Using a large data set that links individual Current Population Survey (CPS) records to employer-reported administrative data, we document substantial discrepancies in basic measures of employment status that persist even after controlling for known definitional differences between the two data sources. We hypothesize that reporting discrepancies should be most prevalent for marginal workers and marginal jobs, and find systematic associations between the incidence of reporting discrepancies and observable person and job characteristics that are consistent with this hypothesis. The paper discusses the implications of the reported findings for both micro and macro labor market analysis

Suggested Citation

  • Katharine Abraham & John Haltiwanger & Kristin Sandusky & James Spletzer, 2009. "Exploring Differences in Employment between Household and Establishment Data," Working Papers 09-09, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:09-09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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