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Multiple Imputation Methodology for Missing Data, Non-Random Response, and Panel Attrition

  • Brownstone, David

Modern travel-behavior surveys have become quite complex; they frequently include multiple telephone contacts, travel diaries, and customized stated preference experiments. The complexity and length of these surveys lead to pervasive problems with missing data and non-random response biases. Panel surveys, which are becoming common in transportation research, also suffer from non-random attrition biases. This paper shows how Rubin's (1987a) multiple imputation methodology provides a unified approach to alleviating these problems.

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Paper provided by University of California Transportation Center in its series University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers with number qt2zd6w6hh.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 1997
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Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt2zd6w6hh
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  1. Edward E. Leamer, 1982. "Let's Take the Con Out of Econometrics," UCLA Economics Working Papers 239, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Imbens, G.W., 1990. "An Efficient Method of Moments Estimator for Discrete Choice Models with Choice-Based Sampling," Discussion Paper 1990-9, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  3. J. A. Hausman, 1976. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Working papers 185, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  4. Horowitz, J.L. & Manski, C.F., 1995. "Censoring of Outcomes and Regressors Due to Survey Nonresponse: Identification and estimation Using Weights and Imputations," Working Papers 95-12, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
  5. Uhlaner, Carole J. & Kim, Seyoung, 1993. "Designing and Implementing a Panel Study of Commuter Behavior: Lessons for Future Research," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3h0721g6, University of California Transportation Center.
  6. Rubin, Donald B, 1986. "Statistical Matching Using File Concatenation with Adjusted Weights and Multiple Imputations," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 4(1), pages 87-94, January.
  7. Little, Roderick J A, 1988. "Missing-Data Adjustments in Large Surveys: Reply," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 6(3), pages 300-301, July.
  8. John Bound & Alan B. Krueger, 1989. "The Extent of Measurement Error In Longitudinal Earnings Data: Do Two Wrongs Make A Right?," NBER Working Papers 2885, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Little, Roderick J A, 1988. "Missing-Data Adjustments in Large Surveys," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 6(3), pages 287-96, July.
  10. Brownstone, David & Golob, Thomas F., 1992. "The Effectiveness of Ridesharing Incentives: Discrete-choice Models of Commuting in Southern California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0w0518qd, University of California Transportation Center.
  11. Brownstone, David, 1991. "Multiple Imputations for LInear Regression Models," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6rv6n3sd, University of California Transportation Center.
  12. Brownstone, David & Valletta, Robert G, 1996. "Modeling Earnings Measurement Error: A Multiple Imputation Approach," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3gb0k9b5, University of California Transportation Center.
  13. Bound, John, et al, 1994. "Evidence on the Validity of Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Labor Market Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(3), pages 345-68, July.
  14. Lave, Charles, 1996. "Are Americans Really Driving So Much More?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2mt1346h, University of California Transportation Center.
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