IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cdl/uctcwp/qt07k76097.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Rail Access Modes and Catchment Areas for the BART System

Author

Listed:
  • Cervero, Robert
  • Round, Alfred
  • Goldman, Todd
  • Wu, Kang-Li

Abstract

To date, far more research has been conducted on the effects of the built environment on transit demand along mainline corridors than in the catchment zones surrounding transit stops. Pushkarev and Zupan (1977), for example, correlated transit ridership for the line-haul segment of trips as a function of residential densities, distance to downtown, and size of downtown; however, they ignored how access trips to transit stops were influenced by such factors. Seminal work by Meyer, Kain, and Wohl (1965) studied factors influencing bus and rail transit demand for three segments of trips -- residential collection-distribution, line-haul, and downtown circulator -- however, their work did not examine the direct effects of land-use variables. For example, in the case of access trips from home to rail stations, or what they call the residential collection-distribution segment, the number of "trip origins per city block" was used as the predictor of access demand. Standard trip generation rates were used to directly estimate access demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Cervero, Robert & Round, Alfred & Goldman, Todd & Wu, Kang-Li, 1995. "Rail Access Modes and Catchment Areas for the BART System," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt07k76097, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt07k76097
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/07k76097.pdf;origin=repeccitec
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brian Everitt, 1980. "Cluster analysis," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 75-100, January.
    2. Cervero, Robert, 1993. "Ridership Impacts of Transit-Focused Development in California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt8sr9d86r, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Cervero, Robert & Bernick, Michael & Gilbert, Jill, 1994. "Market Opportunities and Barriers to Transit-Based Development in California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2c01z5hw, University of California Transportation Center.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Weinzimmer, David & Sanders, Rebecca L. & Dittrich, Heidi & Cooper, Jill F., 2014. "Evaluation of the Safe Routes to Transit Program in CaliforniaÂ," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt3wv3g18b, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    2. Cervero, Robert & Caldwell, Benjamin & Cuellar, Jesus, 2012. "Bike-and-Ride: Build It and They Will Come," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3fd9x0fx, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Park, Sungjin, 2008. "Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating Path Walkability, and Testing Its Impacts on Transit Users’ Mode Choice and Walking Distance to the Station," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0ct7c30p, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Kenneth Joh & Sandip Chakrabarti & Marlon G. Boarnet & Ayoung Woo, 2015. "The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-27, July.
    5. Cervero, Robert & Landis, John, 1997. "Twenty years of the Bay Area Rapid Transit system: Land use and development impacts," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 309-333, July.
    6. Sanders, Rebecca L. & Weinzimmer, David & Dittrich, Heidi & Cooper, Jill F., 2014. "Safe Routes to Transit Program Evaluation Final Report," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt5vj1h92m, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social and Behavioral Sciences;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt07k76097. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lisa Schiff). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/itucbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.