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The Failure Of Uncovered Interest Parity, Forward Bias And Related Puzzles

  • Pippenger, John
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    Three puzzles are closely related to the forward-bias puzzle and the failure of uncovered interest parity: (1) UIP failure is greater for short than long maturities, (2) forward bias is larger between developed than between developing countries and (3) there is no systematic forward bias in commodity markets. A convincing explanation for these puzzles should also explain two other 'facts': (a) the time dependency of the forward bias and failure of UIP and (b) that UIP holds better under a gold standard than under flexible rates. A combination of covered interest parity and monetary policy provides the best available explanation.

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    Paper provided by Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara in its series University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series with number qt50n5p8bv.

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    Date of creation: 17 Apr 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsbec:qt50n5p8bv
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