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Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital

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  • Quigley, John M.
  • Swoboda, Aaron

Abstract

This article compares the level and distribution of the welfare changes from restricting land available for residential development in a city. We compare the economic costs when residential capital is durable with the costs when capital is perfectly malleable and those when population is also freely mobile. Our simulation, based on the stylized specification of an urban location model, suggests that in a more realistic setting with durable capital, the costs of regulation are substantially higher than they are when capital is assumed to be malleable or when households are assumed to be fully mobile. Importantly, the extent of wealth redistribution attributable to these regulations is much larger when these more realistic factors are recognized. When capital is durable, the results also imply that far more new development takes place on previously undeveloped land at the urban boundary, sometimes resulting in an increase in total land under development.

Suggested Citation

  • Quigley, John M. & Swoboda, Aaron, 2009. "Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt18w3n3tx, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:bphupl:qt18w3n3tx
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    1. Quigley, John M. & Swoboda, Aaron M., 2007. "The urban impacts of the Endangered Species Act: A general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 299-318, March.
    2. Wu, JunJie & Plantinga, Andrew J., 2003. "The influence of public open space on urban spatial structure," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 288-309, September.
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    5. Oates, Wallace E. & Schwab, Robert M., 1997. "The Impact of Urban Land Taxation: The Pittsburgh Experience," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 50(1), pages 1-21, March.
    6. John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2005. "Regulation and the High Cost of Housing in California," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 323-328, May.
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    10. Geoffrey Turnbull, 2005. "The Investment Incentive Effects of Land Use Regulations," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 357-395, December.
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    Cited by:

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