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When unstable, growth is less pro poor

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  • Catherine KORACHAIS

    ()

  • Patrick GUILLAUMONT

    () (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International(CERDI))

Abstract

Macroeconomic instability has been increasingly considered as a factor lowering average income growth and by this way is a factor slowing down poverty reduction. But it can also result in slower poverty reduction for a given average rate of growth, due to poverty traps, often examined at the microeconomic level. Testing a model of poverty change on a panel of data for 70 countries from 1981 to 1999, we do find that income instability results in a lower poverty reduction for a given growth. It reflects a distributional effect not fully captured by a change in the Gini coefficient.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine KORACHAIS & Patrick GUILLAUMONT, 2008. "When unstable, growth is less pro poor," Working Papers 200827, CERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:1051
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY & Kangni KPODAR, 2004. "Développement financier, instabilité financière et réduction de la pauvreté," Working Papers 200429, CERDI.
    11. P. Guillaumont & L. Chauvet, 2001. "Aid and Performance: A Reassessment," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(6), pages 66-92.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick GUILLAUMONT, 2009. "Aid effectiveness for poverty reduction:macroeconomic overview and emerging issues," Working Papers 200917, CERDI.
    2. Patrick Guillaumont, 2009. "An Economic Vulnerability Index: Its Design and Use for International Development Policy," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 193-228.
    3. Kelkar, Vijay & Shah, Ajay, 2011. "Indian social democracy: The resource perspective," Working Papers 11/82, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    4. Patrick GUILLAUMONT, 2009. "World Crisis and Protecting Low-Income Countries Against Exogenous Shocks," Working Papers P06, FERDI.
    5. Patrick Guillaumont, 2010. "Assessing the Economic Vulnerability of Small Island Developing States and the Least Developed Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(5), pages 828-854.
    6. Patrick Guillaumont & Laurent Wagner, 2014. "Aid Effectiveness for Poverty Reduction: Lessons from Cross‑country Analyses, with a Special Focus on Vulnerable Countries," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 22(HS01), pages 217-261.

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