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A heterogeneous-agent model of growth and inequality for the UK

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Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of wealth inequality on UK economic growth in recent decades with a heterogeneous-agent growth model where agents can enhance individual productivity growth by undertaking entrepreneurship. The model assumes wealthy people are more able to afford the costs of entrepreneurship. Wealth concentration therefore stimulates entrepreneurship among the rich and so aggregate growth, whose fruits in turn are largely captured by the rich. This process creates a mechanism by which inequality and growth are correlated. The model is estimated and tested by indirect inference and is not rejected. Policy-makers face a trade-off between redistribution and growth.

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  • Meenagh, David & Minford, Patrick & Yang, Xiaoliang, 2018. "A heterogeneous-agent model of growth and inequality for the UK," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2018/17, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2018/17
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    1. Algan, Yann & Allais, Olivier & Den Haan, Wouter J., 2008. "Solving heterogeneous-agent models with parameterized cross-sectional distributions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 875-908, March.
    2. Bagchi, Sutirtha & Svejnar, Jan, 2015. "Does wealth inequality matter for growth? The effect of billionaire wealth, income distribution, and poverty," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 505-530.
    3. Barro, Robert J, 2000. "Inequality and Growth in a Panel of Countries," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 5-32, March.
    4. Meenagh, David & Minford, Patrick & Wang, Jiang, 2007. "Growth and relative living standards - testing Barriers to Riches on post-war panel data," CEPR Discussion Papers 6288, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Thomas Piketty & Gabriel Zucman, 2014. "Capital is Back: Wealth-Income Ratios in Rich Countries 1700–2010," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(3), pages 1255-1310.
    6. Meenagh, David & Minford, Patrick & Wickens, Michael, 2012. "Testing macroeconomic models by indirect inference on unfiltered data," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2012/17, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    7. Ross Levine & Yona Rubinstein, 2017. "Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Do They Earn More?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(2), pages 963-1018.
    8. Radim Bohacek & Michal Kejak, 2005. "Projection Methods for Economies with Heterogeneous Agents," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp258, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
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    12. Kristin J. Forbes, 2000. "A Reassessment of the Relationship between Inequality and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 869-887, September.
    13. Le, Vo Phuong Mai & Meenagh, David & Minford, Patrick & Wickens, Michael, 2011. "How much nominal rigidity is there in the US economy? Testing a new Keynesian DSGE model using indirect inference," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 2078-2104.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Heterogeneous-agent Model; Entrepreneurship; Aggregate Growth; Wealth Inequality; Redistribution; Indirect Inference;

    JEL classification:

    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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