IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cbr/cbrwps/wp445.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Empirical Analysis of Legal Institutions and Institutional Change: Multiple-Methods Approaches and their Application to Corporate Governance Research

Author

Listed:
  • John Buchanan
  • Dominic Heesang Chai
  • Simon Deakin

Abstract

The claim that institutions matter for economic growth and development has so far received a more extensive theoretical treatment than an empirical or methodological one. Basing our approach on a coevolutionary conception of relations between law and the economy, we link theory to method and explore three techniques for analysing legal institutions empirically: 'leximetric' measurement of legal rules, time-series econometrics, and interview-based fieldwork. We argue that while robust measurement of institutions is possible, quantitative techniques have their limits, and should be combined with fieldwork in a multiple-methods approach.

Suggested Citation

  • John Buchanan & Dominic Heesang Chai & Simon Deakin, 2013. "Empirical Analysis of Legal Institutions and Institutional Change: Multiple-Methods Approaches and their Application to Corporate Governance Research," Working Papers wp445, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp445
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/wp445.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Prabirjit Sarkar & Ajit Singh, 2010. "Law, finance and development: further analyses of longitudinal data," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(2), pages 325-346, March.
    2. Simon Deakin & Prabirjit Sarkar, 2008. "Assessing the Long-Run Economic Impact of Labour Law Systems: A theoretical Reappraisal and Analysis of New Time Series Data," Working Papers wp367, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    3. Masahiko Aoki, 2013. "Endogenizing institutions and institutional changes," Chapters, in: Comparative Institutional Analysis, chapter 16, pages 267-297, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Priya P. Lele & Mathias M. Siems, 2009. "Shareholder Protection: A Leximetric Approach," Chapters, in: Thankom Gopinath Arun & John Turner (ed.), Corporate Governance and Development, chapter 10, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. April Klein & Emanuel Zur, 2011. "The Impact of Hedge Fund Activism on the Target Firm's Existing Bondholders," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(5), pages 1735-1771.
    6. April Klein & Emanuel Zur, 2009. "Entrepreneurial Shareholder Activism: Hedge Funds and Other Private Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(1), pages 187-229, February.
    7. Davin Chor & Richard B. Freeman, 2005. "The 2004 Global Labor Survey: Workplace Institutions and Practices Around the World," NBER Working Papers 11598, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Gindis, David, 2009. "From fictions and aggregates to real entities in the theory of the firm," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 25-46, April.
    9. Aoki, Masahiko, 2010. "Corporations in Evolving Diversity: Cognition, Governance, and Institutions," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199218530.
    10. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson, 2005. "Unbundling Institutions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(5), pages 949-995, October.
    11. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    12. Mathias Siems & Simon Deakin, 2010. "Comparative Law and Finance: Past, Present, and Future Research," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 166(1), pages 120-140, March.
    13. Braithwaite, John, 2006. "Responsive regulation and developing economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 884-898, May.
    14. Katarina Juselius, 2011. "Time to reject the privileging of economic theory over empirical evidence? A reply to Lawson," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 423-436.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Simon Deakin & Viviana Mollica & Prabirjit Sarkar, 2015. "Varieties of Creditor Protection: Insolvency Law Reform & Credit Expansion in Developed Market Economies," Working Papers wp473, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. John Buchanan & Dominic Heesang Chai & Simon Deakin, 2013. "Agency Theory in Practice: A Qualitative Study of Hedge Fund Activism in Japan," Working Papers wp448, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Simon Deakin, 2013. "The Legal Framework Governing Business Firms & its Implications for Manufacturing Scale & Performance: The UK Experience in International Perspective," Working Papers wp449, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. Deakin, Simon & Sarkar, Prabirjit & Siems, Mathias, 2018. "Is There a Relationship Between Shareholder Protection and Stock Market Development?," Journal of Law, Finance, and Accounting, now publishers, vol. 3(1), pages 115-146, May.
    3. Deakin, Simon, 2013. "The legal theory of finance: Implications for methodology and empirical research," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 338-342.
    4. John Buchanan & Dominic Heesang Chai & Simon Deakin, 2013. "Agency Theory in Practice: A Qualitative Study of Hedge Fund Activism in Japan," Working Papers wp448, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    5. Simon Deakin, 2018. "The Use of Quantitative Methods in Labour Law Research: An Assessment and Reformulation," Working Papers wp495, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    6. Deakin, S. & Sarkar, P., 2011. "Indian Labour Law and its Impact on Unemployment, 1970-2006: A leximetric study," Working Papers wp428, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Ding Chen & Simon Deakin, 2014. "On Heaven's Lathe: State, Rule of Law, & Economic Development," Working Papers wp464, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    8. Feng Guo & Chenxi Lin & Adi Masli & Michael S. Wilkins, 2021. "Auditor Responses to Shareholder Activism," Contemporary Accounting Research, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 38(1), pages 63-95, March.
    9. Christian Weiss & Stefan Hilger, 2012. "Ownership concentration beyond good and evil: is there an effect on corporate performance?," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 16(4), pages 727-752, November.
    10. John Armour & Simon Deakin & Prabirjit Sarkar & Mathias Siems & Ajit Singh, 2009. "Shareholder Protection and Stock Market Development: An Empirical Test of the Legal Origins Hypothesis," Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 6(2), pages 343-380, June.
    11. Simon DEAKIN & Jonas MALMBERG & Prabirjit SARKAR, 2014. "How do labour laws affect unemployment and the labour share of national income? The experience of six OECD countries, 1970–2010," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 153(1), pages 1-27, March.
    12. Simon Deakin & Prabirjit Sarkar, 2008. "Assessing the Long-Run Economic Impact of Labour Law Systems: A Theoretical Reappraisal and Analysis of New Time Series Data," WEF Working Papers 0043, ESRC World Economy and Finance Research Programme, Birkbeck, University of London.
    13. Deakin, Simon & Sarkar, Prabirjit & Singh, Ajit, 2010. "An End to Consensus? The (Non) Impact of Legal Reforms on Financial Development," MPRA Paper 53352, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Mark R. DesJardine & Rodolphe Durand, 2020. "Disentangling the effects of hedge fund activism on firm financial and social performance," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(6), pages 1054-1082, June.
    15. Jordan Schoenfeld, 2020. "Contracts Between Firms and Shareholders," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 383-427, May.
    16. Brousseau, Eric & Garrouste, Pierre & Raynaud, Emmanuel, 2011. "Institutional changes: Alternative theories and consequences for institutional design," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 79(1-2), pages 3-19, June.
    17. Hirokazu Takizawa, 2017. "Masahiko Aoki’s conception of institutions," Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 523-540, December.
    18. Carsten Herrmann-Pillath, 2017. "Institutional naturalism: reflections on Masahiko Aoki’s contribution to institutional economics," Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 501-522, December.
    19. Closset, Frédéric & Urban, Daniel, 2019. "The balance of power between creditors and the firm: Evidence from German insolvency law," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 454-477.
    20. Bertoni, Fabio & Lugo, Stefano, 2014. "The effect of sovereign wealth funds on the credit risk of their portfolio companies," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 21-35.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Company law; law and finance; coevolution; leximetrics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • K22 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Business and Securities Law
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp445. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Ruth Newman/William Kerslake (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.