IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bwp/bwppap/iriba_wp09.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Brazilian Anti-Corruption Legislation and its Enforcement: Potential Lessons for Institutional Design

Author

Listed:
  • Mariana Mota Prado
  • Lindsey Carson

Abstract

This paper examines the reforms and institutions that have, anecdotally and empirically, demonstrated progress in combating corruption in Brazil. Focusing specifically on the institutions charged with investigating suspected corrupt activities, we contend that institutional multiplicity – the overlap of investigative functions among various governmental entities – has strengthened outcomes by allowing institutions to collaborate, to complement one another, or to compensate for one another’s deficiencies or oversights. We further argue that our analysis of the Brazilian experience reveals the advantages in pursuing alternative institutional approaches, including institutional multiplicity combined with institutional malleability, in developing strategies to reduce corruption.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariana Mota Prado & Lindsey Carson, 2014. "Brazilian Anti-Corruption Legislation and its Enforcement: Potential Lessons for Institutional Design," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series iriba_wp09, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:iriba_wp09
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.brazil4africa.org/wp-content/uploads/publications/working_papers/IRIBA_WP09_Brazilian_Anti-Corruption_Legislation_and_its_Enforcement.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rafael Di Tella & Alberto Ades, 1999. "Rents, Competition, and Corruption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 982-993, September.
    2. Simon Butt, 2011. "Anti-corruption reform in indonesia: an obituary?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(3), pages 381-394, December.
    3. Toke S. Aidt, 2009. "Corruption, institutions, and economic development," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 271-291, Summer.
    4. Fernanda Brollo & Tommaso Nannicini & Roberto Perotti & Guido Tabellini, 2013. "The Political Resource Curse," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1759-1796, August.
    5. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
    6. Claudio Ferraz & Frederico Finan, 2008. "Exposing Corrupt Politicians: The Effects of Brazil's Publicly Released Audits on Electoral Outcomes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 703-745.
    7. Claudio Ferraz & Frederico Finan, 2011. "Electoral Accountability and Corruption: Evidence from the Audits of Local Governments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(4), pages 1274-1311, June.
    8. Feld, Lars P. & Voigt, Stefan, 2003. "Economic growth and judicial independence: cross-country evidence using a new set of indicators," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 497-527, September.
    9. Thierry Verdier & Daron Acemoglu, 2000. "The Choice between Market Failures and Corruption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 194-211, March.
    10. Abbink, Klaus, 2004. "Staff rotation as an anti-corruption policy: an experimental study," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 887-906, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ribeiro, F., 2017. "The accidental Trojan horse: Plea bargaining as an anticorruption tool in Brazil," ISS Working Papers - General Series 627, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:iriba_wp09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rowena Harding). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wpmanuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.