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Transfer Pricing Policy and the Intensity of Tax Rate Competition

Author

Listed:
  • Johannes Becker

    () (Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition and Tax Law)

  • Clemens Fuest

    () (Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation)

Abstract

This note provides a novel argument why countries may have incentives to allow for some profit shifting to low-tax jurisdictions. The reason is that a tightening of transfer pricing policies by high tax countries leads to more agressive tax rate competition by low tax countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Johannes Becker & Clemens Fuest, 2009. "Transfer Pricing Policy and the Intensity of Tax Rate Competition," Working Papers 0930, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
  • Handle: RePEc:btx:wpaper:0930
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    File URL: http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Business_Taxation/Docs/Publications/Working_Papers/Series_09/WP0930.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peralta, Susana & Wauthy, Xavier & van Ypersele, Tanguy, 2006. "Should countries control international profit shifting?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 24-37, January.
    2. Bucovetsky, Sam & Haufler, Andreas, 2008. "Tax competition when firms choose their organizational form: Should tax loopholes for multinationals be closed," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 188-201, January.
    3. Harry Grubert & Joel Slemrod, 1998. "The Effect Of Taxes On Investment And Income Shifting To Puerto Rico," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(3), pages 365-373, August.
    4. Konrad, Kai A., 2009. "Non-binding minimum taxes may foster tax competition," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 109-111, February.
    5. Hong, Qing & Smart, Michael, 2010. "In praise of tax havens: International tax planning and foreign direct investment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 82-95, January.
    6. Keen, Michael, 2001. "Preferential Regimes Can Make Tax Competition Less Harmful," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 54(n. 4), pages 757-62, December.
    7. Slemrod, Joel & Wilson, John D., 2009. "Tax competition with parasitic tax havens," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(11-12), pages 1261-1270, December.
    8. Haupt, Alexander & Peters, Wolfgang, 2005. "Restricting preferential tax regimes to avoid harmful tax competition," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 493-507, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Devereux, Michael P. & Fuest, Clemens & Lockwood, Ben, 2015. "The taxation of foreign profits: A unified view," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 83-97.
    2. Johannes Becker & Ronald B. Davies, 2015. "Negotiated Transfer Prices," Working Papers 201527, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Sheehan Rahman & Jashim Uddin Ahmed, 2012. "An Evaluation of the Changing Role of Management Accountants in Recent Years," Indus Journal of Management & Social Science (IJMSS), Department of Business Administration, vol. 6(1), pages 18-30, January.
    4. Thiess Büttner & Michael Overesch & Georg Wamser, 2014. "Anti Profit-Shifting Rules and Foreign Direct Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 4710, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Davies, Ronald B., 2013. "The silver lining of red tape," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 68-76.
    6. von Hagen, Dominik & Pönnighaus, Fabian Nicolas, 2017. "International taxation and M&A prices," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-040, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Finke, Katharina & Fuest, Clemens & Nusser, Hannah & Spengel, Christoph, 2014. "Extending taxation of interest and royalty income at source: An option to limit base erosion and profit shifting?," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-073, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    8. repec:kap:itaxpf:v:24:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10797-016-9437-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Johannes Becker, 2014. "Strategic Trade Policy through the Tax System," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(9), pages 1237-1246, September.
    10. Clemens Fuest & Samina Sultan, 2017. "How Will Brexit Affect Tax Competition and Tax Harmonization? The Role of Discriminatory Taxation," CESifo Working Paper Series 6807, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Giulia Zilio, 2017. "Cross-Country Differences in Corporate Tax Rates, Anti-Tax Avoidance Rules, and Base Erosion Profit Shifting," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1701, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corporate Taxation; Profit Shifting; Tax Competition;

    JEL classification:

    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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