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Local Neighbourhood and Mental Health: Evidence from the UK

  • Carol Propper
  • Kelvyn Jones
  • Anne Bolster
  • Simon Burgess
  • Ron Johnston
  • Rebecca Sarker

    ()

Using a very local definition of neighbourhood, and characterising that neighbourhood along five relatively orthogonal dimensions based on the socio-economic characteristics of the population of the neighbourhood, this paper examines the association between neighbourhood and levels and changes in mental health. We find that the extent of association between neighbourhood and both levels and changes in mental health is limited. While there are some individuals whose mental health is statistically associated with their neighbourhood composition, the importance of these differences is not large. What appears to be important for levels of mental health are the characteristics of individuals and their households, not place. Changes in mental health are not even associated with the characteristics that predict levels of health.

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File URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp99.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 04/099.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:04/099
Contact details of provider: Postal: 2 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX
Phone: 0117 33 10799
Fax: 0117 33 10705
Web page: http://www.bris.ac.uk/cmpo/
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  1. Andrew McCulloch, 2001. "Ward-level deprivation and individual social and economic outcomes in the British Household Panel Study," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(4), pages 667-684, April.
  2. Katharina Hauck & Nigel Rice, 2004. "A longitudinal analysis of mental health mobility in Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 981-1001.
  3. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-59, May.
  4. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2001. "Well-Being Over Time in Britain and the USA," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 616, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  5. Silver, Eric & Mulvey, Edward P. & Swanson, Jeffrey W., 2002. "Neighborhood structural characteristics and mental disorder: Faris and Dunham revisited," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1457-1470, October.
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