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On Robust Trend Function Hypothesis Testing

Listed author(s):
  • David Harvey, Stephen Leybourne and A M Robert Taylor

In this paper we build upon the robust procedures proposed in Vogelsang (1998) for testing hypotheses concerning the deterministric trend function of a univariate time series. Vogelsang proposes statistics formed from taking the product of a (normalised) Wald statistic for the trend function hypothesis under test with a specific function of a separate variable addition Wald statistic. The function of the second statistic is explicitly chosen such that the resultant product statistic has pivotal limiting null distributions, coincident at a chosen level, under I(0) or I(1) errors. The variable addition statistic in question has also been suggested as a unit root statistic, and we propose corresponding tests based on other well-known unit root statistics. We find that, in the case of the linear trend model, a test formed using the familiar augmented Dickey-Fuller [ADF] statistic provides a useful complement to Vogelsang's original tests, demonstrating generally superior power when the errors display strong serial correlation with this pattern tending to reverse as the degree of serial correlation in the errors lessens. Importantly for practical considerations, the ADF-based tests also display significantly less finite sample over-size in the presence of weakly dependent errors than the original tests.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Birmingham in its series Discussion Papers with number 05-07.

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Length: 16 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2005
Handle: RePEc:bir:birmec:05-07
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT

Web page: http://www.economics.bham.ac.uk

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  1. Eugene Canjels & Mark W. Watson, 1994. "Estimating deterministic trends in the presence of serially correlated errors," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 94-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  2. Serena Ng & Pierre Perron, 1997. "Lag Length Selection and the Construction of Unit Root Tests with Good Size and Power," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 369, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 01 Sep 2000.
  3. Helle Bunzel & Timothy Vogelsang, 2003. "Powerful Trend Function Tests That are Robust to Strong Serial Correlation with an Application to the Prebisch Singer Hypothesis," Econometrics 0304002, EconWPA.
  4. Timothy J. Vogelsang, 1998. "Trend Function Hypothesis Testing in the Presence of Serial Correlation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(1), pages 123-148, January.
  5. Breitung, Jorg, 2002. "Nonparametric tests for unit roots and cointegration," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 343-363, June.
  6. Steven N. Durlauf & Peter C.B. Phillips, 1986. "Trends Versus Random Walks in Time Series Analysis," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 788, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  7. Ayat, Leila & Burridge, Peter, 2000. "Unit root tests in the presence of uncertainty about the non-stochastic trend," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 71-96, March.
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