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Fast reaction police units in Medellín: A budget-constrained maximal homicide covering location approach

Author

Listed:
  • Arlen Guarín

    () (Banco de la República de Colombia)

  • Andrés Ramírez Hassan

    () (Universidad EAFIT)

  • Juan G. Villegas

    () (Universidad de Antioquia)

Abstract

We propose a maximal covering location problem with a budget constraint to determine the optimal location of facilities that provide fast police assistance to homicide hot spots, to mitigate criminal activity in Medellín (Colombia). We use the Google Maps Application Programming Interface (API) to estimate the average traveling times between police units and criminal spots, and impose a budget constraint taking into account the project’s costs. Our procedure identifies how the optimal locations for fast reaction police units have a diminishing marginal coverage pattern when subject to loosened budget constraints.

Suggested Citation

  • Arlen Guarín & Andrés Ramírez Hassan & Juan G. Villegas, 2015. "Fast reaction police units in Medellín: A budget-constrained maximal homicide covering location approach," Borradores de Economia 908, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:908
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Homicide; Maximal Coverage Location Problem; Police Station.;

    JEL classification:

    • C44 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Operations Research; Statistical Decision Theory
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods

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