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The procyclicality of foreign bank lending: evidence from the global financial crisis

Author

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  • Ugo Albertazzi

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Margherita Bottero

    (Bank of Italy)

Abstract

We exploit highly disaggregated bank-firm data to investigate the dynamics of foreign vs. domestic credit supply in Italy around the period of the Lehman collapse, which brought a sudden and unexpected deterioration of economic conditions and a sharp increase in credit risk. Taking advantage of the presence of multiple lending relationships to control for credit demand and risk at the individual-firm level, we show that foreign lenders restricted credit supply (to the same firm) more sharply than their domestic counterparts. Based on a number of exercises testing alternative explanations for such procyclicality, we find that it mainly reflects the (functional) distance between a foreign bank�s headquarters and the Italian credit market.

Suggested Citation

  • Ugo Albertazzi & Margherita Bottero, 2013. "The procyclicality of foreign bank lending: evidence from the global financial crisis," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 926, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_926_13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Beck, Roland & Reinhardt, Dennis & Rebillard, Cyril & Ramos-Tallada, Julio & Peeters, Jolanda & Paternò, Francesco & Wörz, Julia & Beirne, John & Weissenseel, Lisa, 2015. "The side effects of national financial sector policies: framing the debate on financial protectionism," Occasional Paper Series 166, European Central Bank.
    2. Hoggarth, Glenn & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya, 2013. "Financial Stability Paper No 22: Which way do foreign branches sway? Evidence from the recent UK domestic credit cycle," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 22, Bank of England.
    3. Steven Ongena & Günseli Tümer–Alkan & Natalja von Westernhagen, 2018. "Do Exposures to Sagging Real Estate, Subprime, or Conduits Abroad Lead to Contraction and Flight to Quality in Bank Lending at Home?," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 22(4), pages 1335-1373.
    4. Bottero, Margherita & Lenzu, Simone & Mezzanotti, Filippo, 2020. "Sovereign debt exposure and the bank lending channel: Impact on credit supply and the real economy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C).
    5. Glenn Hoggarth, 2017. "Comments on "Foreign banks and credit conditions in EMEs"," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Financial systems and the real economy, volume 91, pages 125-128, Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Carlo Alcaraz & Stijn Claessens & Gabriel Cuadra & David Marques-Ibanez & Horacio Sapriza, 2018. "Whatever it takes. What's the impact of a major nonconventional monetary policy intervention?," BIS Working Papers 749, Bank for International Settlements.
    7. repec:ecb:ecbops:2014166 is not listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    foreign banks; credit crunch; bank balance sheet channel; functional distance;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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