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Pricing behavior and the comovement of productivity and labor: evidence from firm-level data

Author

Listed:
  • Domenico J. Marchetti

    () (Banca d'Italia)

  • Francesco Nucci

    () (Universita' di Roma La Sapienza)

Abstract

Recent contributions have suggested that technology shocks have a negative short-run effect on labor input, contrary to the predictions of standard flexible-price models of the business cycle. Some authors have interpreted this finding as evidence in favor of stickyprice models, while others have either augmented flexible-price models in a number of ways or disputed the empirical finding itself. In this paper we estimate a number of alternative measures of TFP growth for a representative sample of Italian manufacturing firms and find a negative impact of productivity shocks on labor input. Furthermore, by relying on the firmlevel reported frequency of price reviews, we find that the contractionary effect is strong for firms with stickier prices, but it is weaker or not significant for firms with more flexible prices, consistently with the prediction of sticky-price models.

Suggested Citation

  • Domenico J. Marchetti & Francesco Nucci, 2004. "Pricing behavior and the comovement of productivity and labor: evidence from firm-level data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 524, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_524_04
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    File URL: http://www.bancaditalia.it/pubblicazioni/temi-discussione/2004/2004-0524/tema_524.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jordi Gali Garreta & Pau Rabanal, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations; How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?," IMF Working Papers 04/234, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Claudio Michelacci & David Lopez-Salido, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Job Flows," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(4), pages 1195-1227.
    3. Jordi Gali Garreta & Pau Rabanal, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations; How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?," IMF Working Papers 04/234, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Daveri & Cecilia Jona-Lasinio, 2005. "Italy's Decline: Getting the Facts Right," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 64(4), pages 365-410, December.
    2. Eugenio Gaiotti & Alessandro Secchi, 2004. "Is there a cost channel of monetary policy transmission? An investigation into the pricing behaviour of 2,000 firms," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 525, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Gaiotti, Eugenio, 2013. "Credit availability and investment: Lessons from the “great recession”," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 212-227.
    4. Annalisa Cristini & Dario Pozzoli, 2010. "Workplace practices and firm performance in manufacturing: A comparative study of Italy and Britain," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(7), pages 818-842, October.
    5. Fabiani, Silvia & Gattulli, Angela & Sabbatini, Roberto, 2004. "The pricing behaviour of Italian firms: new survey evidence on price stickiness," Working Paper Series 333, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity shocks; Labor input; price stickiness;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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