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The Monetary Transmission Mechanism at the Sectoral Level

Author

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  • Jean Farès
  • Gabriel Srour

Abstract

This paper relies on simple vector autoregressions to investigate the monetary transmission mechanism in broad sectors of the Canadian economy. Two types of disaggregation are considered: one at the level of final expenditures, and one at the level of production. At the level of final expenditures, it is found that a monetary contraction affects exports relatively quickly, and it affects investment much more substantially than the consumption of goods, while it does not seem to affect services. Not surprisingly, durables respond much more substantially than semi-durables to a monetary contraction, while non-durables do not respond significantly. At the level of production, following a monetary contraction, construction reaches the trough of the cycle first, although, cumulatively, manufacturing reacts twice as strongly. The response of the service sector is significant, but it lags manufacturing.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Farès & Gabriel Srour, 2001. "The Monetary Transmission Mechanism at the Sectoral Level," Staff Working Papers 01-27, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:01-27
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    File URL: http://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/wp01-27.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Duguay, Pierre, 1994. "Empirical evidence on the strength of the monetary transmission mechanism in Canada: An aggregate approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 39-61, February.
    2. Hayo, Bernd & Uhlenbrock, Birgit, 1999. "Industry effects of monetary policy in Germany," ZEI Working Papers B 14-1999, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
    3. Marianne Baxter & Robert G. King, 1999. "Measuring Business Cycles: Approximate Band-Pass Filters For Economic Time Series," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 575-593, November.
    4. Joseph H. Haimowitz, 1996. "Monetary policy shocks and price stickiness: an analysis of price and output responses to policy in manufacturing industries," Research Working Paper 96-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    5. Joe Ganley & Chris Salmon, 1997. "The Industrial Impact of Monetary Policy Shocks: Some Stylised Facts," Bank of England working papers 68, Bank of England.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Verónica Mies M. & Felipe Morandé L. & Matías Tapia G., 2002. "Monetary Policy and Transmission Mechanisms: New Elements for an old Debate," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 5(3), pages 29-66, December.
    2. Alam, Tasneem & Waheed, Muhammad, 2006. "The monetary transmission mechanism in Pakistan: a sectoral analysis," MPRA Paper 2719, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 13 Apr 2007.
    3. Héctor F. Bravo & Carlos J. García & Verónica Mies & Matías Tapia, 2003. "Heterogeneity in Monetary Transmission: Sectoral and Regional Effects," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 235, Central Bank of Chile.
    4. Singh, Sunny Kumar & Rao, D. Tripati, 2014. "Sectoral effects of monetary policy shock: evidence from India," MPRA Paper 62069, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Christopher Ragan, 2005. "The Exchange Rate and Canadian Inflation Targeting," Staff Working Papers 05-34, Bank of Canada.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transmission of monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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