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Structural Determinants of Household Savings in Turkey: 2003-2008

Author

Listed:
  • Arda Aktas

    () (Stony Brook University)

  • Duygu Guner

    () (University of Mannheim)

  • Seyfettin Gursel

    ()

  • Gokce Uysal

    () (Bahcesehir University Center for Economic and Social Research (Betam))

Abstract

Widening current account deficits coupled with low private saving rates in Turkey have started a recent policy debate on how household savings can be increased. Using Household Budget Surveys from 2003 to 2008, we study the structural determinants of household savings in Turkey. We consider various different definitions for savings, including durable consumption goods, education and health. Our findings are robust across different definitions. The results indicate that dependency ratios of households are important determinants of savings. Lower shares of dependent children or dependent elderly in the household imply higher saving rates. Moreover, female labor force participation has significant effects, i.e. households with higher shares of working females, have higher saving rates as well. We also find that households in which the head is self-employed or an employer have higher saving rates. Moreover, households with where pension payments constitute a larger share of income save less. Note that pension payments are always coupled with free health benefits. These findings point to strong evidence of precautionary savings.

Suggested Citation

  • Arda Aktas & Duygu Guner & Seyfettin Gursel & Gokce Uysal, 2010. "Structural Determinants of Household Savings in Turkey: 2003-2008," Working Papers 007, Bahcesehir University, Betam, revised Jun 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:bae:wpaper:007
    as

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    File URL: http://betam.bahcesehir.edu.tr/tr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/WorkingPaper0072.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2012
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dmitry Kulikov & Karsten Staehr, "undated". "Microeconometric analysis of household saving in Estonia: income, wealth, financial exposure," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2007-8, Bank of Estonia, revised 03 Feb 2015.
    2. Betcherman, Gordon & Daysal, N. Meltem & Pagés, Carmen, 2010. "Do employment subsidies work? Evidence from regionally targeted subsidies in Turkey," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 710-722, August.
    3. Harris, Mark N & Loundes, Joanne & Webster, Elizabeth, 2002. "Determinants of Household Saving in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(241), pages 207-223, June.
    4. repec:idb:wpaper:427 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Schmidt-Hebbel, K. & Serven, L., 1997. "Saving Across the World: Puzzles and Policies," World Bank - Discussion Papers 354, World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Savaş ÇEVİK, 2015. "Domestic Saving and Tax Structure: Evidence from Turkey," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 23(23).
    2. Tomasz Zalega, 2016. "Incomes and Savings of Polish Seniors in View of Research Outcomes (Poziom dochodow i oszczêdnosci osob starszych w Polsce w swietle wynikow badan)," Problemy Zarzadzania, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 14(59), pages 135-155.
    3. Cengiz Tunc & Abdullah Yavas, 2016. "Not all credit is created equal : Mortgage vs non-mortgage debt and private saving rate in Turkey," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 16(1), pages 25-32.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    private savings; Turkey;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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