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Sequencing Lifeline Repairs After an Earthquake: An Economic Approach

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Abstract

Recoveries after recent earthquakes in the U.S. and Japan have shown that large welfare gains can be achieved by reshaping current emergency plans as incentive-compatible contracts. We apply tools from the mechanisms design literature to show ways to integrate economic incentives into the management of natural disasters and discuss issues related to the application to seismic event recovery. The focus is on restoring lifeline services such as the water, gas, transportation, and electric power networks. We put forward decisional procedures that an uninformed planner could employ to set repair priorities and help to coordinate lifeline firms in the post-earthquake reconstruction.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Casari & Simon J. Wilkie, 2004. "Sequencing Lifeline Repairs After an Earthquake: An Economic Approach," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 587.03, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  • Handle: RePEc:aub:autbar:587.03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matthew O. Jackson, 1992. "Implementation in Undominated Strategies: A Look at Bounded Mechanisms," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(4), pages 757-775.
    2. Thomas A. Garrett & Russell S. Sobel, 2003. "The Political Economy of FEMA Disaster Payments," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(3), pages 496-509, July.
    3. Kunreuther, Howard & Kleffner, Anne E, 1992. "Should Earthquake Mitigation Measures Be Voluntary or Required?," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 321-333, December.
    4. Matthew O. Jackson, 2001. "A crash course in implementation theory," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 18(4), pages 655-708.
    5. Jack Hirshleifer, 1991. "Disaster and Recovery," UCLA Economics Working Papers 639, UCLA Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:reensy:v:152:y:2016:i:c:p:137-150 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Timothy Matisziw & Alan Murray & Tony Grubesic, 2010. "Strategic Network Restoration," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 345-361, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    utilities; inter-temporal decisions; natural disasters; mechanism design; network externalities;

    JEL classification:

    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • L97 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Utilities: General

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